World War One: Mountain Ash and Penrhiwceiber, A-C

Sources: The Aberdare Leader 1914-1919; UK Soldiers Died in the Great War, 1914-1919, published by His Majesty’s Stationery Office.

Index and notes

Other pages: D-E, F-H, I-L, M-O, P-S, T-Y

EDWIN ASHFORD, A.B., OF H.M.S. ARGYLL

17 April 1915 – WAR MEMS FROM THE MOUNT.

A FIGHTING FAMILY.- Mr. John Ashford, 2 Graig Street, Mountain Ash, should be proud of his sons, four of whom are now with the colours. They are Private John in the Royal Irish Fusiliers; Private Morgan in the 2nd Welsh, and Edwin of H.M.S. Argyle, who has been a prisoner of war since November 6th last, and Thomas who joined the R.F.A., and went to Pwllheli on Monday last. A very fine family indeed.
[Note that brother Morgan appears to be the prisoner of war, not Edwin.]

08 April 1916 – Edwin Ashford, A.B., of H.M.S. Argyll.
Edwin Ashford, AB

Edwin Ashford, AB

Edwin Ashford, A.B., of H.M.S. Argyll, which was lost on October 27th, 1915, off the East Coast of Scotland. He has been in training since December 27th, 1915. He is the son of Mr. John Ashford, 2 Graig Street, Mountain Ash. He has passed five examinations successfully. In seaman gunnery he made 207 marks. Also he has had his V.G. He is going to volunteer for air service at the Royal Navy Barracks, Devonport. Edwin has been in two battles in the North Sea under Admiral Beatty. Mr. J. Ashford has four sons with the colours and a grandson and five nephews in the fighting line. His son, Morgan, 2nd Welsh, is a prisoner of war in Germany since November 6th, 1914.

21 April 1917 – Mountain Ash. SAILOR PRESENTED.

The weekly smoker at the Jeffreys Arms Hotel was to honour A.B. Seaman Edwin Ashford, of H.M.S. Leander. Mr. W. Jenkins (Eos Pennar) presided, and Mr. Mog Morgans, on behalf of the Welcome Fund, presented the gallant sailor with a treasury note. Replying, he spoke in high terms of the boys at home who were getting up these functions. He was deeply grateful, as it showed that they were not forgotten by their pals. The artistes were Messrs. Tom Walton, Tommy Morris, John Williams, Mog Morgans, David Powell, Wm. Jenkins, George Anthony, John Powell and John Webber. -Mr. Walton sang the National Anthem.

PRIVATE DAVID ASHILL, 3-5 LANC. FUSILIERS

17 November 1917 – “PRIVATE DAVID ASHILL, 3-5 LANC. FUSILIERS,”
Pte David Ashill

Pte David Ashill

Is the second son of Mr. and Mrs. John Ashill (retired signalman, G.W.R.), late of Miskin Road, Mountain Ash, and now of Brynffynon,Loughor. Ashill joined the Army in September, 1916, and was slightly wounded in April this year. He was again wounded on October 8th last by shrapnel in the right arm and is also suffering from shell shock. He is progressing fairly well at Graylingwell Hospital, Chichester. This gallant lad had a wonderful escape, for pieces of shell tore through his gas mask, cutting in half the metal piece joining the mask to the rubber tube. Another piece tore through both breast pockets, breaking a piece out of a small rule and doubling up the edge of his diary. The explosion has left him deaf in his left ear. Ashill worked at Messrs. Nixon’s when in the Mount, and was a chorister in St. Margaret’s Choir.

ASHTON: Pte William Gordon; Pte Richard D; Signaller Harold H.

29 September 1917 – Penrhiwceiber. RECOVERY.

Private R. D. Ashton, son of Mr. and Mrs. Ashton, Penybryn Terrace, is recovering from his serious illness.

8 December 1917 – “Penrhiwceiber Fighting Family.”
Pte. William G Ashton

Pte. William G Ashton

News has been received by Mr. and Mrs. T. Ashton, of Penybryn Terrace, Penrhiwceiber, that their son, Pte. William Gordon Ashton, 12th Battalion, South Wales Borderers, has been admitted into the 41st Stationary Hospital, France, suffering from shell wounds received on the 23rd of November, at Cambrai, the scene of the last advance. He has been serving in France for eleven months.

Pte. Richard D. Ashton

Pte. Richard D. Ashton

Pte. Richard D. Ashton, another son of Mr. and Mrs. Ashton (Monmouthshire Regt., formerly of the 1st Fifth Welsh), was badly wounded in Gallipoli and now lies in the Norfolk War Hospital at Thorpe, Norwich. We wish them a speedy recovery.

Harold H. Ashton

Harold H. Ashton

The third son, Signaller Harold H. Ashton, 3rd Welsh Regt., is also serving with the Forces. They also have a married son attached to the Welsh Regt. All three boys were prominent footballers of the Penrhiwceiber and Mountain Ash A.F.C. We reproduce the photographs of the three sons.

JAMES BAILEY

[There are some discrepancies in the following reports. That said, I believe the articles all refer to the same James Bailey.]

21 November 1914 – MISKIN MAN KILLED.

Notification was received on Wednesday from Lord Kitchener by Mr Richard Bailey, Glyn Gwyn Street, Miskin, Mountain Ash, that his son, James Bailey, had been killed in action.

28 November 1914 – MOUNTAIN ASH.

KILLED IN ACTION.- As we announced in our last issue, news has reached the parents of James Bailey from the War Office of the death of their son. He was wounded at Ypres, and died in hospital a month later. They have had messages of sympathy from the King and Queen and Lord Kitchener. “Jim,” as he was called, was working at Nixon’s Navigation Colliery up to the time he left for the front in August, and was only 23 years of age. He was liked by all who came in contact with him.

28 November 1914 – Acknowledgment and In Memoriam

ACKNOWLEDGMENT.

BAILEY. – Mr and Mrs Nicholas Bailey and family wish to express their thanks to all who have shown their sympathy to them in their recent sad bereavement.

IN MEMORIAM.

BAILEY. – In loving and affectionate memory of James, the beloved son of Nicholas and Caroline Bailey, of 31 Glyngwyn Street, Miskin, who was wounded in action in the battle of Ypres on the 2nd of October, and interred at Ypres on the 2nd of Nov., 1914.

A place is vacant at our home,
A voice we loved is stilled;
A chair is vacant on our hearth,
Which never can be filled.
A bitter grief, a shock severe,
To part with one we all loved so dear.

From Dad, Mam, Sister & Brothers.

12 December 1914- “PHOTO OF JAMES BAILEY”
James Bailey

James Bailey

Son of Mr and Mrs. Nicholas Bailey, 31 Glyngwyn Street, Miskin, Mountain Ash, who died from wounds received at Ypres, and was interred there.

UK, Soldiers Died in the Great War, 1914-1919

Name: James Bailey
Birth Place: Aberdare, Glam.
Residence: Mountain Ash, Glam.
Death Date: 2 Nov 1914
Death Place: France and Flanders
Enlistment Place: Pontypridd
Rank: Private
Regiment: Welsh Regiment
Battalion: 2nd Battalion
Regimental Number: 958
Type of Casualty: Died of wounds
Theatre of War: Western European Theatre

24 November 1917 – In Memoriam.

BAILEY.- In loving and affectionate remembrance of our dear Son and Brother Jim, late of 31 Glyngwyn Street, Miskin, who died of wounds received in the battle of Ypres November, 1914.- Fondly remembered by his Father and Mother, Sister and Brothers; also by Nicholas J. out in Salonica.

Greater love hath no man than that he lay down his life for others.
God takes our loved ones from our home,
But never from our hearts.

In our lonely hours of thinking
Thoughts of him are always near.

PRIVATE ROLAND BARLOW

30 September 1916 – Mountain Ash. ANOTHER MISKIN HERO.

News has arrived of the death in action of Roland Barlow, son of Mrs. Barlow, 8 Coplestone Street.

07 October 1916 – Private Roland Barlow
Private Roland Barlow

Private Roland Barlow

This is a photo of Private Roland Barlow, son of Mrs. Barlow, 8 Coplestone Street, Mountain Ash, who was killed in action on the Somme on September 3rd last. Our hero in private life was working at the Deep Duffryn Colliery, Mountain Ash, and enlisted in the Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry in September, 1914. He died, just as many other noble fellows have, in the great cause. He is a nephew of Mr. and Mrs. W. Jones, 20 Ceridwen Street, Mountain Ash. “Greater love hath no man than that he lay down his life for his friend.” Barlow was 26 years of age. Privates George Dyer, Oakland Street, Miskin, and James Williams, Penrhiwceiber, were his pals in the same regiment.

UK, Soldiers Died in the Great War, 1914-1919

Name: Rowland Barlow
Birth Place: High Wycombe, Bucks
Death Date: 3 Sep 1916
Death Place: France and Flanders
Enlistment Place: Mountain Ash, Glam.
Rank: Private
Regiment: Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry
Battalion: 6th Battalion
Regimental Number: 15025
Type of Casualty: Killed in action
Theatre of War: Western European Theatre

8 September 1917 – Family Notices

IN MEMORIAM.

BARLOW.- In loving memory or Pte. R. Barlow, late of 8 Coplestone Street, Mountain Ash, who was killed in action in France Sept. 3rd, 1916.-From his loving mother and brothers and sisters.

In the field of battle he bravely took his place,
He fought and died for England and the honour of his race;
He sleeps not in his native land, but ‘neath the foreign skies,
Far from those who loved him best, in a hero’s grave he lies.

A.B. SEAMAN VICTOR H. BEARNE.

23 November 1918 – REPORTED KILLED.

Mrs. Bearne, 7 Allen Street, received news that her son, A.B. Seaman Victor Hugh Bearne, Z400B, Drake Batt., 63rd Royal Naval Division, was missing on March 25th last. She now hears that he is reported killed and would like to have news of him.

30 November 1918 “A.B. Seaman Victor H. Bearne.”
A.B. Victor Hugh Bearne

A.B. Victor Hugh Bearne

This is a photo of A.B. Seaman Victor Hugh Bearne, Drake Batt., 63 Royal Naval Division, who is reported killed. He is the son of Mrs. Bearne, 7 Allen St., Mountain Ash.

PRIVATE W. E. BENNETT

19 October 1918 – “Penrhiwceiber Soldier Falls. Private W. E. BENNETT.”
Pte W. E. Bennett

Pte W. E. Bennett

News has been received by Mr and Mrs Bennett, of 79 Penrhiwceiber Road, of the death in action, of their son, Pte W. E. Bennett, 15th Welsh. The following is a copy of the letter received from the Chaplain: “15th Welsh Regiment, B.E.F., France. Dear Mrs Bennett,- It is with deep regret I write to you about your son, and am extremely sorry I am not able to convey but bad news. Our battalion has been fighting hard during the last month and has achieved wonderful results, but alas! a great number of our brave boys have been killed in the adventure, and your brave boy is one of the killed. Am not able to say the exact day he was killed, as we only keep records of killed, and the date of death is often overlooked when there is severe fighting. He was buried the following day alongside with many of his comrades. The Commanding Officer and all the officers and men in his company wish me to convey their sincerest sympathy. He is greatly missed as he was a wise, sober, and kind-hearted boy. He played his part well, and died for righteousness’ sake. He is gone to a far better land, out of all panic and horrors of war, and at perfect peace with God and man. May God bless and protect you and give you strength to endure this terrible blow and to look beyond the troubles of this present world. Please accept my sincerest sympathy and share in your terrible sorrow.- I remain, Yours sorrowfully moved, D. Davies, Chaplain.”

UK, Soldiers Died in the Great War, 1914-1919

Name: William Edward Bennett
Residence: Penrhiwceiber, Glam.
Death Date: 24 Aug 1918
Death Place: France and Flanders
Enlistment Place: Mountain Ash
Rank: Private
Regiment: Welsh Regiment
Battalion: 15th Battalion
Regimental Number: 203580
Type of Casualty: Killed in action
Theatre of War: Western European Theatre

GUNNER JOHN BERRY

20 October 1917 – GUNNER JOHN BERRY, R.G.A.
Gunner John Berry

Gunner John Berry

Son of Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Berry, 21 Mount Pleasant Terrace, Miskin, desires to thank the friends of Mount Pisgah for the fountain pen, and friends of Penrhiwceiber and Miskin for their kindness to him whist home on leave.

Private William Bishop

13 November 1915 – Prisoners of War.

Acknowledgments of parcels have been received from Pte. Wm. Bishop, whose mother lives at 25 Victoria St., Miskin, and Pte. J. Millett, 1st Batt., Cheshires. Millett says he has now received three parcels.

01 January 1916 – “Miskinite Interned In Germany.”
Pte William Bishop, Miskin

Pte William Bishop, Miskin

This is a photo of Private William Bishop, Duke of Connaught’s Regiment, who is a prisoner of war in Germany. He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. James Bishop, 2 Navigation Villas, Miskin.

5 May 1917 – Mountain Ash. PRISONER OF WAR.

Pte. Wm. Bishop, a prisoner in Germany, thanks Mr. C. Austin for his parcel of cigarettes. His card was two months on the journey.

4 March 1916 – Mountain Ash. PRISONERS IN GERMANY

Acknowledgments of parcels received from the R.O., Mountain Ash, by our lads in Germany, are as follows: Pte. J. Thomas, 2nd Welsh; Pte. John Jones, S.W. Borderers; Pte. C. F. Moore, 1st Wilts.; Pte. J. Weyman, 2nd Welsh, and Pte. Bishop.

PRIVATE BEN BRETTELL

22 July 1916 – “PENRHIWCEIBER SOLDIERS KILLED.”

. . .News reached Penrhiwceiber on Friday last that Private Ben Brettle, R.W.F., son of Mrs. A. Brettle, 4 Park Street, had been killed in action in France on July 3. He was 24 years of age. Mrs. Brettle has one son in the King’s Royal Rifles, who has also been wounded in action. Much sympathy is felt for the family.

UK, Soldiers Died in the Great War, 1914-1919

Name: Benjamin Brettell
Birth Place: Lye, Worcs
Residence: Penrhiwceiber
Death Date: 3 Jul 1916
Death Place: France and Flanders
Enlistment Place: Cardiff
Rank: Private
Regiment: The Royal Welsh (Welch) Fusiliers
Battalion: 9th Battalion
Regimental Number: 11751
Type of Casualty: Died of wounds
Theatre of War: Western European Theatre

14 July 1917 – PRIVATE BEN BRETTELL.
Pte Ben Brettell

Pte Ben Brettell

In loving memory of our dear son and brother. Pte. Ben Brettell, 4 Park Street, Penrhiwceiber, who was killed in France July 3rd, 1916.- Ever remembered by Mother, Sisters and Brother.

Nobly he did his duty,
Bravely he fought but fell,
But the sorrows of those that mourn him
Only aching hearts can tell.

It may be a soldier’s honour
For his country’s call to fall,
But we cannot think of the glory,
For the sorrow it has caused us all.

Private Brettell joined the Royal Welsh Fusiliers in the early months of the war. He was previously employed at Penrikyber Colliery.

PTE. A BRIDGEMAN

6 March 1915 – Lingering in a German Camp.

Mrs. Bridgman, 17 Tirfelin, Miskin, has received news of her husband, who is a prisoner in a German Camp. A friend of his, Pte. Thomas, of the Middlesex Regt., who has been exchanged (hopeless cripple) writes on Bridgman’s behalf. He says “they are starving, and what little food they do get is not fit for a dog to eat. They are run away with lice, and are only allowed to write 12 lines in a letter or 6 lines on a postcard.” The writer adds, “But you may send food or cigarettes out here.” They had to lie on a bit of straw put in a sack, and were wearing half worn wooden clogs. “If we complained in letters, they were torn up,” continues Pte. Thomas. “Please send your husband some boots and socks, and plenty of tinned food.” This gallant soldier, who writes on behalf of his pal, is not afraid of his name being published. What a sad commentary on the way we are treating our full-paunched prisoners!

18 March 1916 – Pte. A Bridgeman.

Pte. A Bridgeman, Miskin

Pte. A Bridgeman, 2nd Welsh, 17 Tirfelin, Miskin. Wounded and now a prisoner in Germany.

7 October 1916 – Mountain Ash. PRISONER OF WAR.

The following have acknowledged parcels of food, etc., sent to them in Germany:- Private A. Bridgman, Private T. Morgan, Private P. Sullivan, Private C. F. Moore, Private T. Edmunds, and Private W. Baldwin.

21 December 1918 – HOME FROM GERMANY.

Terrible Tales Told by Mountain Ash Men.

Each day brings home more of our tired men who have been in the toils of Germany. Our representative has interviewed ten of these gallants, in order to place in the hands of our readers authentic news of their treatment.

. . .
Pte. Albert Bridgman, 2/Welsh, 17 Tirfelin Street, Miskin. This soldier is a married man with 3 children, and was captured after being wounded on Nov. 1st, 1914, at Ypres. He sums up his troubles as follows: “Rough treatment, food uneatable, the principal being boiled mangolds.” He was hurt badly, and on one occasion his teeth were broken. He was kicked at Cassel Camp. Bad as the food was, it got worse towards armistice day. He arrived home on Nov. 30th.
. . .

Capt. (Dr.) M. J. Cahill

18 October 1919 – DOCTOR’S RETURN.

After several applications, the Mount Workmen have succeeded in getting Lieut. and Dr. M. J. Cahill released from the army, in which he has served with distinction iu the R.A.M.C.

15 November 1919 – “POPULAR MOUNTAIN ASH DOCTOR’S RETURN. CAPT. DR. CAHILL DEMOBILISED.”
Capt. (Dr.) M. J. Cahill

Capt. (Dr.) M. J. Cahill

The friends and well-wishers of Capt. (Dr.) M. J. Cahill will he gratified to learn that on the occasion of his demobilisation he has received the thanks of the military authorities for his services as surgeon in France and Flanders. Capt. Cahill volunteered for active service at the beginning of the war, but it was not until the need of medical assistance became pressingly urgent that he was called to the colours. His return home will be welcomed by the wide circle of his friends and patients.

Pte George Carhart

25 December 1915 – Up and down the valley. ONE OF THE SEAFORTHS

One of our gallant lads of the 9th Seaforth Highlanders, Pte. Geo. Carhart, son of Mr. and Mrs. Carhart, Church House, Cefnpennar, came home for a spell last week-end. He has been in the trenches for eight months, and has been in three great battles. The last one was the great advance at Loos, where the Highland Brigade covered themselves with glory and lost more men than in any of their previous engagements. Carhart has not seen many of the Mount boys, being in a Scottish regiment, but he caught a glimpse of the late Edgar Meredith going into the trenches one day, and also met Jack Williams (Cefnpennar). Carhart has been in many tight corners, and has had the good fortune to come through without a scratch. A warm spot, Carhart relates, was that when one of his officers, Lieut. Kennedy, was killed at his side. This brave lad returned to dutv on Wednesday.

8 January 1916 – Soldier’s Gratitude.

Dear Mr. Editor,- May I through your popular paper thank the people of Cefnpennar and district for the kindness they showed me and for the presents they gave me while I was home on furlough the other day. I also wish to thank the Cefnpennar Lodge of Buffs for the privilege and pleasure of being made a member and for the hearty welcome they gave me. ] have a good stock of cigs. for a little time, and the presents prove useful and handy.- I am, Pte. George Carhart, 5293, C. Coy., 9th Batt. Seaforth Highlanders, Pioneers, 9th Scottish Division, France.

08 January 1916 – Pte George Carhart, Cefnpennar
Pte George Carhart, Cefnpennar

Pte George Carhart, Cefnpennar

Pte George Carhart, Seaforth Highlanders, son of Mr and Mrs Carhart, Church House, Cefnpennar, Mountain Ash. One of the heroes of Loos.

08 April 1916 – “Killed in Action.”

Pte. Geo. Carhart, Seaforth Highlanders, son of Mr. and Mrs. Carhart, Church House, Cefnpennar. He was one of the heroes of Loos.

UK, Soldiers Died in the Great War, 1914-1919

Name: William Carhart
Birth Place: Waderidge, Cornwall
Death Date: 30 Mar 1916
Death Place: France and Flanders
Enlistment Place: Aberdeen, Glam
Rank: Private
Regiment: Seaforth Highlanders
Battalion: 9th Battalion
Regimental Number: S/5293
Type of Casualty: Died of wounds
Theatre of War: Western European Theatre

8 April 1916 – Family Notices

DEATHS.

CARHART.- Died of wounds in France on March 30th, Private W. G. Carhart, 2nd beloved son of Mr. and Mrs. Carhart, Church House, Cefnpennar, age 20 years. Deeply mourned.

15 April 1916 – Family Notices

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS.

CARHART.- Mr and Mrs. Carhart and family, Church House, Cefnpennar, wish to thank their many friends for kind letters and expressions of sympathy in their sad bereavement.

31 March 1917 – Family Notices

In Memoriam.

CARHART.- In loving memory of my dear friend, Pte. W. G. Carhart, late of Cefnpennar, who died of wounds received in action March 30th, 1916; age 20 years.

No mother’s care did him attend,
Nor o’er him did a father bend,
No sister by to shed a tear,
No brother by his words to hear;
Wounded, dying in a foreign land,
No father by to take a hand,
No mother near to close his eyes,
Far from his native land he lies.

-George.

CARHART.- In ever loving memory of Pte. George Carhart, 9th Seaforths, beloved son of Mr. and Mrs. Carhart, 10a John Street, Abercwmboi, who died of wounds received in France, March 30th, 1916. Age 20 years.

He walked away so proudly,
His young head slightly held,
His footsteps never faltered,
His courage never failed;
There on the field of battle
He calmly took his place,
To fight and die for Britain
And the honour of his race.

-Sadly missed by his loving father, mother, sisters and brothers.

CARHART.- In ever loving memory of Pte. George Carhart, of the 9th Seaforths, who died of wounds received in France, March 30th, 1916.

Sweet is thy rest, Oh, sweetheart dear,
It’s sweet to breathe thy name;
In life I loved you very dear,
In death I do the same.

-Ever remembered by his loving sweetheart, Millie.

30 March 1918 – Family Notices

IN MEMORIAM.

CARHART.- In ever-loving memory of our dear Son and Brother, Private George Carhart, Seaforth Highlanders, beloved son of Mr. and Mrs. Carhart, 10a John Street, Abercwmboi, who died of wounds in France, March 30th, 1916, aged 20 years. “Greater love hath no man than this, that he lay down his life for his friends.” For God, King and Country.-Never forgotten by his loving Father, Mother, Brothers, Sisters and Sister-in-law, Gladys.-R.I.P.

CARHART.- In loving memory of Private George Carhart, 9th Seaforths, who died of wounds received in France, March 30th, 1916.-Ever remembered by his loving Sweetheart, Millie.
They miss him most
Who loved him best.

29 March 1919 – Family Notices

BIRTHS, MARRIAGES & DEATHS BIRTHS, MARRIAGES, DEATHS, ACKNOWLEDGMENTS AND IN MEMORIAM NOTICES.

CARHART.- In loving memory of our dear son and brother, Private George Carhart, Seaforth Highlanders, beloved son of Mr. and Mrs. Carhart, 10a John Street, Aberewmboi, who died of wounds at No. 50 Northumbrian Casualty Clearing Station, France, March 30th, 1916. Aged 20 years.

His country called, he answered with his life.
-Never forgotten by his loving father, mother, brothers and sister, Sam, Harry and Lucy; also sister and brother-in-law, Flo and Will.

CARHART.- In loving memory of Pte George Carhart, of the 9th Seaforths, who died of wounds received in France, March 30, 1916.

Lone be my life, and sad my lot,
I must be still and murmur not.

-Ever remembered by his sweetheart Millie.

Sapper Edward Carr

5 January 1918 – Penrhiwceiber. HOME ON LEAVE.

Sapper Edward Carr, R.E., is home from France. Enlisting in 1915 he received his training at Chatham, and Was drafted to Egypt. He was sent from there to Gallipoli, and was present at the evacuation, after which he returned to Egypt, thence to France. He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. J. Carr, 5 Harris View, Penrhiwceiber

6 July 1918 – “Penrhiwceiber Soldier’s Death.”

News has been received by Mr and Mrs J. Carr, 5, Harris View, Penrhiwceiber, that their son, Sapper Edward Carr, Royal Engineers, passed away in the 58th Casualty Clearing Station, France, on the 18th of June, suffering from influenza followed by pneumonia. Sapper Carr had been in the Army for 3 1/2 years, and had seen much service. He had been to Egypt, Salonika and was also present at the evacuation of the Dardanelles; he had also been in France for 18 months. He was in his 24th year. The following is a copy of a letter received from his major:- “Dear Madam, I was very grieved to hear of the death of your son. He had had a very trying time during May and June. He was a man who stuck to his work and hated the very idea of going to hospital and leaving others to do his work. I sincerely hope that you will comfort yourself with the satisfaction that he died as heroically as men on the battlefield who are granted honours for their deeds. He refused to give in and fought against sickness, as he would have fought against the enemy – to my mind he died as a hero. I was fortunately able to send some of his old comrades to his funeral to a place many miles away.- G. A. F. Brown, Major, R.E., O.C. 136 (A.T.) Co. R.E.”

13 July 1918 – Sapper Edward Carr.
Sapper Edward Carr

Sapper Edward Carr

Sapper Edward Carr, 5 Harris View, Penrhiwceiber. Died (as reported in Leader last week) at a Clearing Station in France from influenza.

10 August 1918 – Military.

Pte Reg Carr, of 5 Harris View, son of Mr and Mrs Carr, is home on leave. His brother, Ted, died on active service a few weeks ago.

UK, Soldiers Died in the Great War, 1914-1919

Name: Edward Carr
Birth Place: Llanwonno, Glam.
Death Date: 18 Jun 1918
Death Place: France and Flanders
Enlistment Place: Port Talbot, Glam.
Rank: SPR.
Regiment: Royal Engineers
Regimental Number: 36026
Type of Casualty: Died
Theatre of War: Western European Theatre
Comments: 136Th A.T. Coy., R.E.

Driver R. C. Christie

3 March 1917 – Driver R. C. Christie, A.S.C.
Driver R. C. Christie, A.S.C.

Driver R. C. Christie, A.S.C.

This is a photo of Driver R. C. Christie, A.S.C., of 9 Gladstone Street, Miskin, Mountain Ash, a brother to Mrs. M. Harman, of that address. He is now in Egypt, and states that during the last few months he has frequently been in hospital owing to attacks of Malaria.

William H Coombey

24 April 1915 – WAR MEMS FROM THE MOUNT.

Enteric.- Gunner Wm. Hy. Coombey, R.F.A., son-in-law of Mr and Mrs John Francis, Greenhill Villa, Fox St., has been invalided from France with the above disease. He lies in Chelsea Hospital.

26 June 1915 – WAR MEMS FROM THE MOUNT.

Off Again.

Gunner Wm. Henry Coombey, son-in-law of Mr. and Mrs. John Francis, Greenhill, Fox Street, who has been invalided home from France, has fully recovered and returned on Tuesday morning.

03 July 1915 – Gunner William H Coombey, Mountain Ash
Gunner William H Coombey, Mountain Ash

Gunner William H Coombey, Mountain Ash

18 September 1915 – A Soldier’s Wife.

We respectfully tender our sympathy to Corporal Coombey (late of the T.V.R.), whose portrait appeared in the “Leader” a few weeks ago, on the death of his wife, which took place on Monday. Mrs. Coombey had been ailing some time and her soldier husband got special leave to come and see her some time ago. She was the daughter of Mr and Mrs John Francis (overman), Greenhill, Mountain Ash.

15 September 1917 – Family Notices. In Memoriam.

COOMBEY.- In ever-loving memory of my dear wife, Blodwen Coombey, who died Sept. 13, 1915.

Oft my thoughts do wander
To a grave so far away,
Where we laid my loved one
Two years ago to-day.

Ever remembered, though parted. Her sorrowing husband, Harry, with the B.E.F., France.

Other pages: D-E, F-H, I-L, M-O, P-S, T-Y
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