World War One: Mountain Ash and Penrhiwceiber, D-E

Sources: The Aberdare Leader 1914-1919; UK Soldiers Died in the Great War, 1914-1919, published by His Majesty’s Stationery Office.

Index and notes

Other pages: A-C, F-H, I-L, M-O, P-S, T-Y

CPO Howell David

25 March 1916 – CPO Howell David.
CPO Howell David

CPO Howell David

Chief Petty Officer Howell David, of H.M.S. Assistance, which is with the Grand Fleet. He is the son of Mr. Daniel David, College Street, Aberdare, and joined the Navy a year ago. A short time ago he was a popular Rugby player with the Mountain Ash Team.

Pte. David John Davies

19 September 1914 – War Mems from the Mount.

The following communications have been received from men of the Mount fighting in His Majesty’s Forces on sea and land:-

“Everything all right; quite safe and sound, although in the firing line,” writes David J. Davies, 23rd Royal Welsh Fusiliers, to his father, Mr Wm. Morgan Davies, Hamilton House, Hamilton Street.

12 June 1915 – WAR MEMS FROM THE MOUNT. Another Hero.

Pte. David John Davies, of the Royal Welsh Fusiliers, elder son of Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Davies, Hamilton House, Mountain Ash, was killed in action on May 16th, near Festubert. He had been through many battles, and was invalided home last December. When convalescent he rejoined the 1st Batt. of the Royal Welsh in March. That regiment was still in the thick of the fighting, and on the date above mentioned made a gallant dash on the German trenches, where they covered themselves with glory- but only 60 answered the roll call when it was all over. There were many Mount boys in that glorious dash, all of whom were wounded. These included Humphrey Morgan, Arthur Street, Miskin; Jack Davies, Cilhaul Terrace, Charles Manley, Darren Las; Dennis Hennessy, Napier Street, and C. Rossiter, Park Street, Penrhiwceiber. Pte. Davies was the only one to succumb.

19 June 1915 – “Killed in Action.”
Pte. David John Davies (on right)

Pte. David John Davies (on right)

The above photo represents two of our gallant heroes, one of whom unfortunately is no more. He is Pte. David John Davies, elder son of Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Davies, Hamilton House, Mountain Ash, a report of whose death appeared in our last issue. Pte. Davies is on the right of the picture (in uniform). The other is Sergt. Davies, no relation, but of the same regiment.

UK, Soldiers Died in the Great War, 1914-1919

Name: David John Davies
Birth Place: Llanwonno, Glam.
Death Date: 16 May 1915
Death Place: France and Flanders
Enlistment Place: Mountain Ash
Rank: Private
Regiment: The Royal Welsh (Welch) Fusiliers
Battalion: 1st Battalion
Regimental Number: 9265
Type of Casualty: Killed in action
Theatre of War: Western European Theatre

20 May 1916 – Family Notices. In Memoriam.

DAVIES.- In loving memory of Pte. David John Davies, Royal Welsh Fusiliers, the beloved son of Mr. and Mrs. W. Davies, 5 Bruce Street, Mountain Ash, who was killed in action at the battle of Festubert, May 16, 1915, aged 27 years.

In the field of battle
He bravely took his place,
And fought and died for England
And the honour of his race.
He sleeps not in his native-land,
But ‘neath the foreign skies,
Far from those who loved him best,
And in a hero’s grave he lies.

Evan Davies

11 December 1915 – Penrhiwceiber. MILITARY.

Private Evan Davies, of the R.F.A., who enlisted about six months ago, is now home prior to his departure on active service. He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Davies, Tanycoed Street. Also Private Joshua James, son of Mrs. Ed. James, Green Hill Villa, has left for the front,

29 April 1916 – Evan Davies, R.F.A.

1916 04 29 - Evan Davies
Driver Evan Davies, R.F.A., Penrhiwceiber, now in France. He is the son of Mr and Mrs Thos. Davies, Tanycoed Street.

16 November 1918 – “Driver EVAN DAVIES.”
Driver Evan Davies

Driver Evan Davies

Driver Evan Davies, 4557, R.F.A., Welch Division, 38th B 122, has been home on a few days leave from France, after being on active service for three years. He has been in many battles, including Mametz Woods in 1916 and again in 1918, and the 3rd battle of Ypres, when the Welsh Division took Pilken Ridge and Langemark. He also saw a great deal of hard fighting around Armentieres last March during the great German attack. Driver Davies is the son of Mr and Mrs Thomas Davies, 13 Tanycoed Terrace, Penrhiwceiber.

Pte. Idwal Davies

8 December 1917 – “Another Penrhiwceiber Soldier Wounded.”
Pte. ldwal Davies

Pte. ldwal Davies

News has been received by Mr. and Mrs. James Davies, 3 Penybryn Terrace, that their son, Pte. ldwal Davies, 19th Royal Welsh Fusiliers, has been wounded, and has been admitted into Lewisham Military Hospital, London. He has been in France for 6 months, and has a brother, Pte. David W. Davies, Welsh Regt., also serving in France. He was wounded on the 23rd of November. We wish him a speedy recovery.

Corporal Levi Davies

07 October 1916 – “A PENRHIWCEIBER M.M.”
Corp Levi Davies

Corp Levi Davies

Ceiberites will rejoice to learn that a Penrhiwceiber man has won the Military Medal for gallantry on the battlefield. He is Corporal Levi Davies, of the 17th Welsh Regiment. This young hero joined the Army on January 9th, 1915, and was drafted out June 1st last. In such a short space of time he has not only gained promotion from Private to Corporal, but has also won the coveted M.M. He is only 23 years of age. He is married, his wife living at 6 Park St. Herewith is a copy of the routine orders by Major-General H. G. Ruggles, C.B., M.V.O., Commanding 40th Division:- “Military Medal: The Corps Commander has awarded the Military Medal to No. 26138 Corporal Levi Davies, 17th Welsh, S. Battalion, Welsh Regiment, for the following act of gallantry:- On the night of September 3-4, 1916, during a heavy bombardment, Private Seal, also of the 17th Welsh Regiment, was completely buried. Corporal Davies rushed to his assistance. Despite the fact that three times he was blown off his feet and on two occasions blown into a mine entrance, he carried on, and although in a dazed condition assisted Stretcher-bearer S. Jones, the two working under heavy fire to extricate Seal alive. Unfortunately Private Seal died from his injuries.” Captain Gough, of the 17th Welsh Regiment, has also forwarded congratulations to Corporal Davies. Previous to enlisting he was employed at Penrikyber Colliery.

Private S. D. Davies

15 January 1916 – “MOUNTAIN ASH FAMILY BEREAVED.”
Pte S D Davies, Mountain Ash

Pte S D Davies, Mountain Ash

Mr. and Mrs. Seth Davies, 26 Allen Street, Mountain Ash, wish to thank those who sympathised with them in the loss of their only child, Private S. D. Davies, who was killed in France November 14, 1915.

Mr. and Mrs. Davies have received a letter from Messrs. Tom Earley and Evan Morris, written on behalf of Pte. Davies’s former fellow-workmen. It states that they all mourn the death of such a noble man, one who had endeared himself to all by his straight-forward, frank and manly character, and sympathise deeply with his parents. The parents, the letter adds, have the consolation of knowing that they led their son into the right path and that he laid down his life for his friends. Simon Davies’s friends will always treasure their remembrance of him.

UK, Soldiers Died in the Great War, 1914-1919

Name: Simon David Davies
Birth Place: Llanwonno, Glam.
Residence: Mountain Ash, Glam.
Death Date: 14 Nov 1915
Death Place: France and Flanders
Enlistment Place: Mountain Ash, Glam.
Rank: Private
Regiment: Duke of Edinburgh’s (Wilthsire) Regiment
Battalion: 6th Battalion
Regimental Number: 17881
Type of Casualty: Killed in action
Theatre of War: Western European Theatre
Comments: Formerly 15988, Duke Of Cornwall’S Light Infantry.

Corporal W. Davies

3 June 1916 – Miskin. WELCOME HOME.

. . .
-The other hero is Corporal William Davies, also with the Royal Engineers in France. He has seen 18 months’ service. He was also at the Ypres and Loos engagements. He relates that during one engagement he had a very narrow escape, a shell burst by his feet, killing some of his comrades, but he escaped unhurt. Corporal Davies is well known in Miskin, having resided there for almost 30 years. His home is 12 Victoria Street. The two left on Wednesday last for the firing line again. They had a hearty send-off.

10 June 1916 – Corporal W. Davies
Corp W. Davies

Corp W. Davies

Corporal W. Davies, 12 Victoria Street, Miskin.

Pte. W. G. Davies

11 December 1915 – “Two Mount Soldiers in the East.”
1915 12 11 - Davies and Jones

1915 12 11 – Davies and Jones

Pte. W. G. Davies, Records Office, 29th Division, 3rd Echelon, Base, Egypt., M.E.F., writes as follows to our Mountain Ash representative:- “I am in the South Wales Borderers, having been transferred thence from the Dragoon Guards. I had a spell on the Peninsula, having strained myself. Then I had a spell in Hospital. I am not yet fit, and am now on the clerical staff at the base. The first day 1 was here I met an old pal in Jack Jones, High Street. He, too, has been on the Peninsula, and has been wounded in the arm and thigh. You can’t imagine the pleasure it gave me meeting him, not having seen him for months. We mucked in together first night, now we peg together in the same tent. Jack’s most exciting time was just after he was wounded. The Turks were very near, and a pal of his, Frank Jones, Cwmaman, had to carry him back from the line of fire. He won’t say much about it. My own was during our great assault on the famous Chocolate Hill, 21st August. I won’t try to describe it. You will have read accounts. I am now setting up as trainer. Jack has turned out splendidly. Any lad in Alexandria at the weight – the Mount lads await him. And if the next competition suits you may hear more of us.”

Sec. Lieut. W. J. Davies

8 December 1917 – Penrhiwceiber. SERIOUSLY WOUNDED.

Mrs. W. J. Davies,Railway Terrace, Penrhiwceiber. has received information that her husband, Lieut. W. J. Davies, is now lying seriously wounded in hospital in France.

5 January 1918 – “PENRHIWCEIBER OFFICER WOUNDED.”
Lt W J Davies, RGA

Lt W J Davies, RGA

Official information has been received by Mrs. W. J. Davies, Cynon Cottage, Penrhiwceiber, that her husband, Sec. Lieut. W. J. Davies, R.G.A., has been dangerously wounded and is lying in a serious condition at a casualty clearing station in France. He joined the Army as a Private in May, 1916, and afterwards entered an Artillery School in London in September. He passed the exams with distinction, and was gazetted in January of this year, and went to France in May, 1917, and has been in very severe fighting. He was in the fighting for Hill 70 in August of this year; also in the Cambrai Battle, where he was dangerously wounded on Dec. 1st. Prior to the war Lt. Davies was senior assistant master at Penrhiwceiber School. Lieut. Hacking, writing to Mrs. Davies, states “his cheeriness is greatly missed in our little home out here by his follow officers and men alike, and all wish him a speedy recovery.” News was received later that he is progressing favourably, and as soon as possible will be brought to England. Mrs. Davies takes this opportunity of thanking the numerous friends for their kind enquiries.

Driver Ewart Duglan

5 August 1916 – “A Young Miskin Warrior”
Driver Ewart Duglan

Driver Ewart Duglan

This is a photo of Driver Ewart Duglan, son of Mr. and Mrs. William Duglan, 3 Jones Street, Miskin, Mountain Ash. He enlisted in His Majesty’s Army, A.S.C., twelve months last April, and has served fourteen months in France. He is only seventeen years of age.

Pte. William Edwards

15 July 1916 – “PENRHIWCEIBER SOLDIER’S DEATH.”
Pte William Edwards, RFA

Pte William Edwards, RFA

Pte. William Edwards, R.F.A., whose home was at 73 [?] Pentwyn Avenue, Penrhiwceiber, has been killed in action in France. He joined his regiment at the outbreak of war, and had seen 18 months service in the trenches. The sad news was communicated to his sister-in-law by the War Office. Pte. Edwards was single, and was 40 years of age. It appears that he was blown up by a mine. He has one brother at home wounded; another, Trevor, serving in Egypt, and another, David, in Gibraltar. Great sympathy is felt for the bereaved family.

Private Hugh Thomas Ellis

12 May 1917 – “Missing Since a Year Ago.”
Pte Hugh Thomas Ellis

Pte Hugh Thomas Ellis

This is a photo of Private Hugh Thomas Ellis, who was in C. Coy., 8th Batt. R.W.F., 40th Infantry Brigade, 13th Division, British Indian Expeditionary Force. He has been reported missing since April, 1916. His parents, Mr. and Mrs. Ellis, 17 James Street, Miskin, Mountain Ash, would be very glad to receive any information concerning their son. In a letter home, dated March 1st, 1916, Private Ellis, writing from somewhere in India, describes the place where he was as ‘No Man’s Land.’ He adds that they were awaiting orders to go to the firing line.

UK, Soldiers Died in the Great War, 1914-1919

Name: Hugh Thomas Ellis
Birth Place: Mountain Ash, Glam.
Residence: Miskin
Death Date: 9 Apr 1916
Death Place: Mesopotamia
Enlistment Place: Cardiff
Rank: Private
Regiment: The Royal Welsh (Welch) Fusiliers
Battalion: 8th Battalion
Regimental Number: 11952
Type of Casualty: Killed in action
Theatre of War: Asiatic Theatres

Nurse Lily Ellis

24 June 1916 – “Mount Nurses Honoured by His Majesty.”
Nurse Lily Ellis

Nurse Lily Ellis

Nurse Lily Ellis, eldest daughter of Mr. Hugh Ellis, the well-known choir conductor of Mountain Ash, has been honoured by being mentioned in the birthday honours list of His Majesty the King.

Miss Ellis has for many years been attached to her honourable profession. She was trained at Swansea General and Eye Hospital, and also had great private experience in the same town and at Malvern. She was a sister in the operating theatre at Lewisham Infirmary and joined the Territorial Force at the outbreak of war. In April of this year His Majesty visited the 1st Southern General Hospital at Birmingham, where she was stationed. She has received a number of congratulations on her well merited distinction.
. . . [See also Nurse Isaac.]

Evans: B.P.; Dan

14 July 1917 – “Two Mountain Ash Boys.”
L to r, B P Evans, Dan Evans

L to r, B P Evans, Dan Evans

This is a photograph of two old Mountain Ash boys. The one sitting is B. P. Evans, a Sergeant in the New Zealand Rifles, and stationed at District Headquarters. Previous to the war he was in the ministry, having gone out to New Zealand five years ago. The one standing is Dan Evans, the once noted tenor in these parts, who belongs to the N.Z.M.C., and is now at the front. Don Evans left for New Zealand about six years ago, and before enlisting was a Superintendent in an Insurance Company. Both these young men are N.C.O.’s holding the rank of Sergeant. Dan Evans gained his stripes after the photo was taken.

Driver David J. Evans

1 June 1918 – “Miskin Man’s M.M.”
Driver David J. Evans

Driver David J. Evans

Driver David J. Evans has been awarded the Military Medal for gallantry in action. This brave young man won his distinction by saving his gun whilst under heavy fire from the enemy. He is the son of Mr. John Evans, Bush Road, Miskin, and was in private life a haulier employed by Mrs. Smith, grocer, Oxford Street, Mountain Ash.

Sapper Evan Evans

17 March 1917 – Sapper Evan Evans
Sapper Evan Evans

Sapper Evan Evans

This is a photo of the late Sapper Evan Evans, whose widow and four children reside at 64 Church Street, Penrhiwceiber. He joined at the outbreak of war. After undergoing training he was sent to France in April, 1915. He was gassed, and also sustained an accident to his finger, blood-poisoning supervening. He was admitted to hospital in Boscomb, Hants, in October, 1915. After recuperating he came home on leave, and then went back to his depot in Chatham. He was drafted back to France in January, 1916, and was killed on January 13th, 1917. Sapper Evans had been in the 1st Army Mine Rescue School, and held a certificate of proficiency in the use of mine rescue apparatus.

UK, Soldiers Died in the Great War, 1914-1919

Name: Evan Evans
Birth Place: Ystrad, Glam.
Death Date: 13 Jan 1917
Death Place: France and Flanders
Enlistment Place: Mountain Ash, Glam.
Rank: SPR.
Regiment: Royal Engineers
Regimental Number: 79489
Type of Casualty: Killed in action
Theatre of War: Western European Theatre
Comments: Formerly 14754, Dorset Regt. (254Th Tunn. Coy., R.E.)

Pte. Frank Evans

21 September 1918 – “Pte. Frank Evans.”
Pte. Frank Evans

Pte. Frank Evans

Pte. Frank Evans, No. 72625, 14th Platoon C. Coy., 10th Batt., Sherwood Foresters, is posted missing since March 23rd. He was captured at Cambrai. Pte. Evans is 26 years of age, and his house is at Graig House, Arthur Street, Miskin. Prior to joining up was a collier at Penrikyber Colliery.

21 December 1918 – HOME FROM GERMANY.

Terrible Tales Told by Mountain Ash Men.

Each day brings home more of our tired men who have been in the toils of Germany. Our representative has interviewed ten of these gallants, in order to place in the hands of our readers authentic news of their treatment.

. . .
Pte. Frank Evans, 10/Notts. and Derbys, Graig House, Arthur Street, Miskin. – Volunteered in Oct., 1914, and was captured near Cambrai in March last. He was at the back of the German lines for 2 months and received shocking treatment regarding food, otherwise he was fairly treated. “Starved I was,” said Evans. He came home on Dec. 1st.
. . .

Pte. Henry Austin Evans

29 January 1916 – “The War. Pte. Henry Austin Evans.”
Pte H A Evans, Mountain Ash

Pte H A Evans, Mountain Ash

Pte. Henry Austin Evans, 1/5th Welsh Regt., son of Mr. and Mrs. Rees Evans, 21 Phillip Street, Mountain Ash, invalided home from the Dardanelles with enteric fever He is at the Southern Military Hospital, Birmingham.

UK, Soldiers Died in the Great War, 1914-1919

Name: Harry Evans
Death Date: 6 Nov 1917
Death Place: France and Flanders
Enlistment Place: Mountain Ash
Rank: Private
Regiment: Welsh Regiment
Battalion: 1st 6th Battalion
Regimental Number: 288034
Type of Casualty: Killed in action
Theatre of War: Western European Theatre

9 November 1918 – Family Notices

EVANS.- In loving memory of Henry Austin Evans (Harry), elder beloved son of Mr and Mrs Rees Evans, 21 Phillip Street, Mountain Ash, who fell in action November 6th, 1917, in his 23rd year. – Today recalls sad memories.

8 November 1919 – Family Notices

IN MEMORIAM.

EVANS.- In loving memory of Henry Austin (Harry), the dearly beloved elder son of Mr & Mrs Rees Evans, 21 Phillip Street, Mountain Ash, who was killed in France, November 6th, 1917, in his 23rd year.- From dad, mam, sisters and brother Bertie. – “To-day recalls sad memories.”

EVANS.- In loving remembrance of my dear brother Harry, who was killed in action in France, November 6th, 1917.- From his sister and brother-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. Clift.
“Thy will be done.”

Private Tom Evans

15 July 1916 – “PENRHIWCEIBER SOLDIER KILLED.”

Private Tom Evans, Penrhiwceiber, of the Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, has been killed in action. Private Evans was prior to enlistment employed at Penrhiwceiber Colliery. He was 25 years of age. His wife, who lives at 48 Church Street, received the information on Friday last. Tom was a courageous man, and was well liked by all who knew him. We extend our sympathy to his sorrowing wife. He had been on active service since the outbreak of war, and was drafted out to France 18 months ago. Appended is a copy of a letter sent to deceased’s wife by the Major commanding A Co.:-

“Dear Mrs. Evans,- I regret to have to tell you that your husband was killed last night. We had just come into the trenches, and he was bringing up rations with other men. The enemy suddenly started shelling, and they caught the trench just where your husband was. It buried five men. Two were killed instantly, and the other three were badly wounded. He was buried in a cemetery behind the lines, and his grave marked with a cross with his name and number on it. It will always be carefully looked after. I need hardly tell you that I and the whole company feel his loss very much. He was an excellent, keen soldier, and was one of the very best of wire men. Please accept my deepest sympathy. If I can do anything for you or answer any questions please let me know.”

22 July 1916 – Private Tom Evans, Penrhiwceiber
Pte Tom Evans

Pte Tom Evans

Private Tom Evans, Penrhiwceiber, of the Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, killed in action in France as reported in our last issue.

UK, Soldiers Died in the Great War, 1914-1919

Name: Sidney Thomas Evans
Birth Place: Bedweelty, Mon.
Residence: Penrhiwceiber, Glam.
Death Date: 2 Jul 1916
Death Place: France and Flanders
Enlistment Place: Mountain Ash. Glam.
Rank: Private
Regiment: Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry
Battalion: 6th Battalion
Regimental Number: 14989
Type of Casualty: Killed in action
Theatre of War: Western European Theatre

Other pages: A-C, F-H, I-L, M-O, P-S, T-Y
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