World War One: Mountain Ash and Penrhiwceiber, F-H

Sources: The Aberdare Leader 1914-1919; UK Soldiers Died in the Great War, 1914-1919, published by His Majesty’s Stationery Office.

Index and notes

Other pages: A-C, D-EI-L, M-O, P-S, T-Y

Sergeant J. J. Faulkner

28 October 1916 – “Miskin Sergeant’s Death.”
Sgt J J Faulker

Sgt J J Faulkner

This is a photo of Sergeant J. J. Faulkner, of the 13th Rifle Brigade, whose wife and children live at 28 Glyngwyn Street, Miskin. Appended is an extract from a letter just received by deceased’s wife, dated October 11th, 1916:- “Dear Madame,- We have received a very sad report about your husband from Captain G. Rivers of the same battalion, now lying in Darrell Hospital, Queen Ann Street. Our informant states that he saw your husband killed instantaneously by a shell at Pozieres on the 10th of July. He was standing quite close at the time, and is certain of the facts.- Yours faithfully, K. Robson, for the Earl of Lucan.”

UK, Soldiers Died in the Great War, 1914-1919

Name: Joseph James Faulkner
Birth Place: Battersea, Surrey
Residence: Mountain Ash, Glamorgan
Death Date: 10 Jul 1916
Death Place: France and Flanders
Enlistment Place: Penrhiwceiber, Glam
Rank: Sergeant
Regiment: Rifle Brigade
Battalion: 13th Battalion
Regimental Number: S/4726
Type of Casualty: Killed in action
Theatre of War: Western European Theatre

Jas Francombe

6 July 1918 – “Missing Since March.”
Jas Francombe

Jas Francombe

This photo is of Jas Francombe, son of Mr. Thomas Francombe, 5 Victoria Street, Miskin, and brother to Police Sergt. Francombe, Aberdare. He was a Company Sergeant Major in the Cheshire Regiment. Joined up when employed at Messrs Nixon’s Collieries, Mountain Ash, in January, 1915, and went to France the following August. Was wounded in the battle of Mametz Wood on July 1, 1916, and was in hospital in this country for some time. Was drafted to France a second time, and now reported missing from March 24th last, no news having since been heard of him.

UK, Soldiers Died in the Great War, 1914-1919

Name: James Francombe
Birth Place: Which, Bristol, Glos.
Death Date: 24 Mar 1918
Death Place: France and Flanders
Enlistment Place: Mountain Ash, Glam.
Rank: C.S.M.
Regiment: Cheshire Regiment
Battalion: 9th Battalion
Regimental Number: 17040
Type of Casualty: Killed in action
Theatre of War: Western European Theatre

Pte. Edwin Gardiner

30 October 1915 – Mems from the Mount. Died in Action.

News has been received of the death in action of Pte. Edwin Gardiner, 1st Dorsets, husband of Mrs. Gardiner, 59 Victoria Street, Miskin.

30 October 1915 – Family Notices. Acknowledgements.

GARDINER.- Mrs. Gardiner and family, 59 Victoria Street, Miskin, Mountain Ash, desire to thank all friends for their kind messages of sympathy on the death of Pte. Edwin Gardiner, 1st Dorsets, who was killed in action Oct. 5, 1915.

UK, Soldiers Died in the Great War, 1914-1919

Name: Edwin Gardner
Birth Place: Nailsea, Som.
Residence: Mountain Ash, Glam.
Death Date: 5 Oct 1915
Death Place: France and Flanders
Enlistment Place: Aberdare, Glam.
Rank: Private
Regiment: Dorsetshire Regiment
Battalion: 1st Battalion
Regimental Number: 3/8149
Type of Casualty: Killed in action
Theatre of War: Western European Theatre

4 December 1915 – “Tribute to Dead Miskin Hero.”
Pte. Edward Gardiner, B. Co., 1st Dorset Regiment,

Pte. Edwin Gardiner, B. Co., 1st Dorset Regiment,

Pte. Edward [Edwin] Gardiner, B. Co., 1st Dorset Regiment, husband of Mrs. Gardiner, 59 Victoria Street, Miskin. Co. Sergt. Major Shepherd writes to her saying: “He always did his duty well and without complaint. He was a quiet, steady, well conducted man, and well liked by all the Company.” Captain Alger also writes of his sterling capabilities as a soldier. “He was killed in the exploding of a mine,” says the Captain. “What was so hard about it was that he was killed at time when none of us thought he was in any danger at all.” [Name in article is Edward but in family notices is Edwin.]

7 October 1916 – Family Notices. In memoriam

GARDINER.- In loving memory of Private Edwin Gardiner (Ted), killed in France, Oct. 5th, 1915.

I think of him in silence,
When I am all alone;
When duty called then he obeyed,
And went to his country’s call.
He fought as a British soldier should,
And answered in Death’s Roll Call

-Ever remembered by his loving wife and children.

GARDINER.- In loving memory of Private Edwin Gardiner, killed in France Oct. 5th, 1915.

He sleeps not in his native land,
But ‘neath the foreign skies,
Far from those who loved him best,
But in a hero’s grave he lies.

-Not forgotten by mother, father, brother and wife.

Pte. D. Gethin

[There are some discrepancies in the articles related to David Gethin: I feel reasonably sure that this is the same person but think further confirmation would be wise.]

7 August 1915 – PENRHIWCEIBER

ON FURLOUGH.

Private David Gethin, of 9 Haswell Street, Ynysboeth, came home on furlough on Thursday last. Gethin joined the “Rhondda Pals” nine or ten months ago, and leaves for Winchester in a few days, from where he expects to be drafted to the front.

14 August 1915 – Pte. D. Gethin, Penrhiwceiber
Pte. D. Gethin, Penrhiwceiber

Pte. D. Gethin, Penrhiwceiber

14 October 1916 – “PENRHIWCEIBER CORPORAL KILLED.”

News has now been received by Mrs. E. Gethin, wife of Corpl. David Gethin, 9 Melbourne Street, Matthewstown, who was attached to the 13th Service Batt., 2nd Rhondda, Welsh Rgt., that he has been killed in action. A comrade, Pte. Jas. Cox, of the same regt., and of Matthewstown, states that Gethin died in his arms. Corpl. Gethin joined on Nov. 5th, 1915. Previously he was employed as engine-driver at the Penrikyber Colliery. He was 25 years of age. He was the elder son of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Gethin, winder at No. 1 Penrikyber Pit, who lives at 12 Pentwyn Avenue. Corpl. Gethin’s wife has also received a letter from the chaplain of the regiment stating that he died of wounds received through a shell bursting in the dug-out. His death is deeply mourned by officers and men, who join in extending their sympathy to the widow. He was buried in a small British Cemetery close to the firing line.

[The statement that Gethin joined in Nov. 1915 appears to be an error as the Leader’s photograph was in August 1915.]

21 October 1916 – Corporal D. Gethin, Penrhiwceiber

This is a photo [same as 14 August 1915] of Corporal D. Gethin, Penrhiwceiber, whose death in action we recorded last week. He was in the attack at Mametz Wood and at the battle of the Somme. He was killed by shell explosion in the trenches on September 16.

UK, Soldiers Died in the Great War, 1914-1919

Name: David Gethin
Birth Place: Llanwonno, Glam.
Death Date: 17 Sep 1916
Death Place: France and Flanders
Enlistment Place: Penrhiwceiber, Glam.
Rank: A Q.M.S.
Regiment: Welsh Regiment
Battalion: 13th Battalion
Regimental Number: 19214
Type of Casualty: Died of wounds
Theatre of War: Western European Theatre

23 December 1916 – Family Notices

In Memoriam.

GETHIN.- In loving memory of Sergt. David Gethin, 13th Batt., Welsh Regt., beloved son of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Gethin, 4 Pentwyn Avenue, Penrhiwceiber, killed in action Sept. 16th, 1916.

We little thought when we said Goodbye
We were parted for ever, and you were to die,
But the foreign grave was the bitterest blow,
None but an aching heart can know.

-Mourned by Mam and Deta.

15 September 1917 – Family Notices

IN MEMORIAM.

GETHIN.- In ever-loving memory of Sergt. David Gethin, 10th Batt. Welsh Regt., killed in action somewhere in France, Sept. 16th, 1916, age 25 years, the beloved son of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Gethin, 4 Pentwyn Avenue, Matthewstown, Penrhiwceiber.

Twelve lonely months have passed away
Since our great sorrow fell,
Still in our hearts we mourn the loss
Of him we loved so well.
We loved him in life.
Let us not forget him in death.

-Deeply mourned by Mam and Deta.

GETHIN.- In loving memory of our dear brother, Sergt. David Gethin, Welsh Regt., killed somewhere in France, Sept. 16, 1916, age 25 years.

Days of sadness still come o’er us,
Secret tears do often flow,
For memory keeps our dear Davie near us.
Though he died one year ago.

Ever remembered by his brothers, Wyndham and Joseph.

21 September 1918 – Family Notices

IN MEMORIAM.

GETHIN.- In loving memory of our brother, David, killed at Ypres, September 16, 1916.- Ever remembered by his brother, sister-in-law, and niece, Emrys, Annie and Gwyneth.
“Rest lightly on his ashes, gentle earth.”

GETHIN- In ever loving memory of Sergt David Gethin, 13th Batt. Welsh Regiment, killed in action Somewhere in France, September 16th, 1916, age 25 years. The beloved son of Mr and Mrs Joseph Gethin, 4 Pentwyn Avenue, Matthewstown, Penrhiwceiber.

No one knows how much we loved him.
Too far away your grave to see,
But not too far to think of thee.- Davie.

-Deeply mourned by Mam and Deta

GETHIN.- In loving memory of our dear brother, Sergt David Gethin, 13th Batt. Welsh Regiment, killed in action, Somewhere in France, September 16th, 1916. Age 25 years.

To-day recalls sad memories.

Ever remembered by his brothers, Wyndham and Joseph.

 

Corporal Bert Gibbon

9 January 1915 – PENRHIWCEIBER. FAMILY’S FINE RECORD.

The townspeople of Penrhiwceiber must feel very proud of Mr. and Mrs. Gibbon, Penrhiwceiber Road, who have five sons serving in His Majesty’s Army. Alf., the eldest, served in the South African War, and is now a special reservist at Buckinghamshire. Will is in the Gloucester’s; Tom, Oswald, and Bert, who were popular members of the Penrhiwceiber Guild A.F.C., are in the Dorset’s. Tom, who is home on furlough, speaks well of the officers. We wish them God-speed.

16 January 1915 – WAR MEMS FROM THE MOUNT.

More Ceiberites.- Albert and Oswald Gibbon have joined the Dorsets, and Tom and Richard Owen the Fusiliers. Brothers in Arms.

26 February 1916 – “PENRHIWCEIBER SOLDIERS MISSING AND WOUNDED.”

Mr. and Mrs. Gibbon, of Penrhiwceiber, have received the news that one of their sons (Bert) is amongst the missing, and also that another son, Oswald, has been dangerously wounded in France. The two were well known in the district, and were two ardent footballers. Mr. and Mrs. Gibbon have three other sons fighting abroad for their King and country, namely, Tom, Will, and Alfred.

1 April 1916 – The War. Penrhiwceiber Soldier Missing.

His Captain’s Tribute.

No official report has come to hand regarding Lance Corporal Bert Gibbon, who, it was rumoured some time ago, had been killed in action. The following is a copy of a letter sent to Mrs. Gibbon, his wife, by the Captain of his unit:- “I can only say that we have as yet had no information regarding your husband. He was last seen jumping into a German trench with some others. Of his fate no one can tell with certainty. We anxiously wait and hope for the best, and as soon as anything definite is heard, we shall let you know. The best I can hope is that he is a prisoner of war, and from what I know of your husband I believe he would be fighting to the last. There is no one in the Company for whom I have a greater respect, or upon whom reliance could better be placed. Popular, cheery, courteous, and very capable, he was worthy to fight in a great cause. I can only wish you courage like his and great patience.- I am, G. O. Hanlon, Capt., 6th Coy. Dorset Regt.”

22 April 1916 – “Penrhiwceiber Hero’s Death.”

Lance Corporal Bert Gibbon, of the 6th Dorsets Regiment, who had for some weeks past been reported missing and assumed by his Captain to have been taken a prisoner of war, has now been officially reported killed in action. On Thursday morning last Mrs. Gibbon, his wife, residing at 88 Penrhiwceiber Road, received the sad news from the War Office. Lance Corpl. Gibbon, as reported in a previous issue, was last seen jumping along with others of his regiment into a German trench during an attack on February 16th. He joined the Forces in January, 1915, and was drafted out in April to France, where he had been engaged up to his death. He was of a noble and courageous disposition, and admired by all. He was most popular in football circles, having for many seasons played for the Penrhiwceiber Guild A.F.C. He was the youngest son of Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Gibbon, of Penrhiwceiber Road, who have three more sons fighting for their King and country. He was 23 years of age. Much sympathy is felt for his wife and child and his parents.

At St. Winifred’s Church on Sunday evening, the Rev. J. R. Jones, B.A., Vicar, conducted a memorial service in respect of the late Lance Corporal Bert Gibbon, who was an esteemed member of the church. The rev. gentleman paid a very high tribute to the late gallant soldier, and made appropriate general references to the bravery of our soldiers at the front. The “Dead March” from “Saul” was played by Mr. Jeffreys, the church organist.

29 April 1916 – Corporal Bert Gibbons, Penrhiwceiber
Corporal Bert Gibbons

Corporal Bert Gibbons

Corporal Bert Gibbons, Penrhiwceiber, whose death in action was reported in our last issue.

UK, Soldiers Died in the Great War, 1914-1919

Name: Albert Gibbon
Birth Place: Llanwonno, Glam.
Residence: Penrhiwceiber, Glam.
Death Date: 16 Feb 1916
Death Place: France and Flanders
Enlistment Place: Mountain Ash, Glam.
Rank: Corporal
Regiment: Dorsetshire Regiment
Battalion: 6th Battalion
Regimental Number: 12757
Type of Casualty: Killed in action
Theatre of War: Western European Theatre

21 October 1916 – Penrhiwceiber. SOLDIER’S RETURN.

On Monday Woodfield Terrace was decorated to welcome home Private William James Watts, of the A.S.C., who has returned from the firing line. He has been on active service for 18 months. He has been in many engagements. His wife and child live at 89 Woodfield Terrace. He returns to France in a few days. In an interview he said that he discovered Corporal Bert Gibbon, of Penrhiwceiber, dead on the road, having been gassed.

Private Samuel Gibbon

23 September 1916 – Penrhiwceiber. PRISONER OF WAR IN GERMANY.

Private Samuel Gibbon, of the Royal Fusiliers, but now attached to the Manchester Regiment, 5th Batt., has been wounded, and is now a prisoner of war at Obrdrufe, Saxony. He is the only son of Mrs. Baker, 70 Glanlay Street, Penrhiwceiber. Private Gibbon played for several seasons for the Merthyr Rugby Football Club. He was also a Northern Union international. In a letter to his mother from the German hospital he says that he is now progressing satisfactorily. He received shrapnel wounds in the shoulder, back, and hand. He far prefers playing a good old game of football to fighting the Huns, he says. He does not, however, complain of ill-treatment at the hands of his captors. He is married, and his wife and two little children reside at Merthyr. He joined the Army last Christmas, and was drafted out in June.

30 September 1916 – Private Samuel Gibbon
Private Samuel Gibbon

Private Samuel Gibbon

Private Samuel Gibbon, of Penrhiwceiber, now a prisoner of war in Germany.

Private Tom Gibbon

12 June 1915 – “PENRHIWCEIBER. GASSED.”

Followers of local football will be distressed to learn that Tom Gibbon, the steady old Guild halfback, has been severely gassed at the front during one of the attacks upon what was once Hill 60. Tom is one of four brothers serving their King and country. From how many other local families have four brothers enlisted? With our deepest sympathy for Tom’s distress, we offer to Mr. and Mrs. Gibbon our heartiest congratulations upon the splendid example set by their gallant sons.

12 August 1916 – “Two Aberdare Valley Heroes”
Seated, Pte Miles, left, Pte Gibbon, right

Seated, Pte Miles, left, Pte Gibbon, right

[See also Morgan Miles]

On Saturday Private Tom Gibbon, of the 1st Dorsets, one of the heroes of the “great advance,” returned to the firing line. A large number assembled at the G.W.R. Station, Penrhiwceiber, to bid him adieu. He was given a most hearty send-off. On Friday evening he was presented by Mr. Evan Evans, son of Dr. T. Evans, Lee Hotel, on behalf of his numerous friends, with a wristlet watch. Private Gibbon cordially thanked his friends.

The portrait represents: Sitting, Private Miles (left) and Private Gibbon (right). Standing is a comrade, a Doncaster corporal.

UK, Soldiers Died in the Great War, 1914-1919

Name: Thomas Arthur Gibbon
Birth Place: Merthyr, Glam.
Death Date: 12 Apr 1918
Death Place: Home
Enlistment Place: Mountain Ash, Glam.
Rank: SPR.
Regiment: Royal Engineers
Regimental Number: 198099
Type of Casualty: Died
Theatre of War: Home
Comments: Formerly 8152, Dorset Regt. (183Rd Tunn Coy., R.E.)

Pte. Stanley Godwin

7 October 1916 – Mountain Ash. MORE HEROES.

News is to hand that Gunner Stanley Godwin, R.F.A., step-son of Mr. Eb. Griffiths, Woodland Street, was killed in action on Sept. 9th.
. . .

21 October 1916 – Pte. Stanley Godwin
Pte. Stanley Godwin

Pte. Stanley Godwin

The above photo is of Pte. Stanley Godwin, who gallantly died for the great cause, in the Battle of the Somme. He is the step-son of Mr. Eb. Griffiths, Woodland Street, Mountain Ash.

UK, Soldiers Died in the Great War, 1914-1919

Name: Stanley Godwin
Birth Place: Llanwonno, Glam.
Death Date: 9 Sep 1916
Death Place: France and Flanders
Enlistment Place: Mountain Ash, Glam.
Rank: Gunner
Regiment: Royal Horse Artillery and Royal Field Artillery
Regimental Number: W/603
Type of Casualty: Killed in action
Theatre of War: Western European Theatre

21 October 1916 – Family Notices. In Memoriam.

Godwin.- Sacred to the memory of Gunner Stanley Godwin, R.F.A., only beloved stepson of Eb. Griffiths, Woodland Street, Mountain Ash, who was killed in action in France on Sept. 9th, 1916. Age 20.

4 November 1916 – Mountain Ash. OFFICER’S LETTER.

Lt. Bayliss, R.F.A., writes to Mr. Eb. Griffiths, Woodland Street, as follows: “Your son, Gunner Godwin, met his death on the night of September 9th, when in action behind Trones Wood. A shell came through the roof of the gun pit, where he and his Sergeant and five other men were sleeping, killing him and the Sergt. and two of his pals. He felt no pain. He just fell asleep after a hard day’s work and awoke in another world. I need hardly say that he is missed by his officers and comrades. He is buried just behind Trones Wood.”

8 September 1917 – Family Notices. IN MEMORIAM.

GODWIN.- In loving memory of a good son and brother, Gunner Stanley Godwin, R.F.A., who fell at Trones Wood, France. Sept. 9, 1916. Age 20.- Also of our little Emma Violet, who died June 29, 1911.

A soldier’s grave – a touching thing,
Where loving hands no flowers can bring;
But God, in his great love and care,
Will guard our Stanley lying there.

Fondly remembered by Dad and Sisters – Annie, 85 Woodland St., Mountain Ash, and Maud, Devonport.

14 September 1918 – IN MEMORIAM.

TODWIN. [sic]- With unceasing love and in ever tender memory of our dear Stanley, who fell at Trones Wood, 9th September, 1916, aged 20.
Too far away your grave to see;
But not too far to think of thee.
-Ever remembered by dad and sisters. Annie and Maud.

HAROLD VICTOR GOUGH

9 June 1917 – “HAROLD VICTOR GOUGH.”
Harold V Gough

Harold V Gough

This is a photo of the fifth son of Mr. Jabez Gough (Gough’s Garage, Mountain Ash), who has just obtained his certificate of proficiency in radiotelegraphy. He is 16 years of age, and is the youngest student to have taken this certificate for the whole of Great Britain nd Ireland. Young Gough was a student at the Mountain Ash County School, under Mr. W. U. Williams, M.A., and obtained a scholarship there. He was always a most promising scholar, and looks like going a long way. We wish him every success.

PRIVATE W. GREEN

14 October 1916 – The War. PRIVATE W. GREEN, MATTHEWSTOWN.
Pte W Green

Pte W Green

Mrs. Green, 11 Walsh Street, Matthewstown, was notified last week by the War Office that the death of her husband is presumed, he being reported missing since the battle of Loos Oct. 2nd, 1915. Private 2154 W. Green belonged to the 1st Welsh Regiment, and was 42 years of age when reported missing. He was a reservist when war broke out, and worked at the Cwmcynon Colliery. He leaves a widow and seven small children.

UK, Soldiers Died in the Great War, 1914-1919

Name: William Green
Birth Place: Ystradyfodwg, Carmarthen
Residence: Ynysboeth, Glam.
Death Date: 2 Oct 1915
Death Place: France and Flanders
Enlistment Place: Cardiff
Rank: Private
Regiment: Welsh Regiment
Battalion: 1st Battalion
Regimental Number: 2154
Type of Casualty: Killed in action
Theatre of War: Western European Theatre

Private S. H. Hamlin

08 January 1916 – “Penrhiwceiber Soldier Killed.”

Mr. and Mrs. Hamlin, of No. 1 Rheola Street, Penrhiwceiber, were informed last Friday morning of the death of their son, Private S. Harry Hamlin, of the Somerset Light Infantry, who has been killed in action in France. Private Hamlin was very popular amongst all the young people at home, and respected by all who knew him. From information received from France he was shot through the throat and lung, death following a few hours afterwards. We extend our deepest sympathy to the family in their sad bereavement. His officers highly commended the heroic manner in which Private Hamlin did his duty. Mr. and Mrs. Hamlin have another son serving his King and country, namely, Private Alf. John Hamlin, A.S.C., at present stationed at Larkhill, Salisbury.

15 January 1916 – “A ‘Ceiber Hero.”
Pte S H Hamlin, Penrhiwceiber

Pte S H Hamlin, Penrhiwceiber

Private S. H. Hamlin, S.L.I., Penrhiwceiber, who was killed in action in France, as reported in our last issue.

UK, Soldiers Died in the Great War, 1914-1919

Name: Samuel Henry Amblin
Birth Place: Shepton Mallet, Somerset
Residence: Penrhiwceiber, Glam.
Death Date: 26 Dec 1915
Death Place: France and Flanders
Enlistment Place: Bristol
Rank: Private
Regiment: Somerset Light Infantry
Battalion: 8th Battalion
Regimental Number: 19796
Type of Casualty: Died of wounds
Theatre of War: Western European Theatre

Private Morgan L Harland

12 October 1918 – “Private Morgan L Harland”
Private Morgan L Harland

Private Morgan L Harland

Private Morgan L Harland, Artists’ Rifles, whose death in action in France on August 27th, was reported in last week’s “Leader.” Deceased, who resided at Granville Terrace, Mountain Ash, was an Associate of the Chartered Institute of Secretaries. He was articled to Mr G. A. Evans, J.P.

UK, Soldiers Died in the Great War, 1914-1919

Name: Morgan Lewis Harland
Birth Place: Mount Ash, Glam
Residence: Mount Ash, Glam.
Death Date: 27 Aug 1918
Death Place: France and Flanders
Enlistment Place: Mount Ash Glam.
Rank: Private
Regiment: London Regiment
Battalion: 28th (County of London) Battalion (Artists Rifles)
Regimental Number: 767084
Type of Casualty: Killed in action
Theatre of War: Western European Theatre

Pte. W. G. Harvey

15 April 1916 – Pte. W. G. Harvey
1916 04 15 - Pte W G Harvey

1916 04 15 – Pte W G Harvey

Pte. W. G. Harvey, 13 Glamorgan Street, Penrhiwceiber. He is attached to the R.A.M.C. and is on duty on the Hospital Ship Asturias.

Private Ivor Hill

9 October 1915 – Mems from the Mount.

The Cosmo Club entertained one of the members, Pte. Ivor Hill, last Friday evening. He has been doing his bit in the Dardanelles, and has been invalided home. The Club-room was tastefully decorated, and about 50 members present when the young soldier walked in with his father, Mr. G. H. Hill. the following toasts were given: “The Royal Family,” proposed by Mr G. Davies, seconded by Mr. F. Mears; “Army and Navy,” Mr. G. H. Hill and Mr. J. Bluett; “Our Allies,” Mr T. Mansfield and Mr Rubicorn; “Cosmoites at the Front,” Mr David Lewis and Mr. J. Windsor. The harmony was given by Messrs. Sansy Greenham, J. Spracklen, G. H. Hill, F. Bray, F. Mears, F. Lawrence and Corpl. West. Duet, “The Slacker’s Remorse,” H. Greenham and E. J. Foote. Clog dance, Mr Herbert Hill, and Messrs. Dick Morgan and Victor Badcock gave humorous recitations.

27 November 1915 – War Mems from the Mount.

Speed the Parting Guest.

The guest of the evening at the weekly smoker of the Cosmos was Mr Herbert Hill, eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. George Hill, Fruiterer, Miskin. He has joined the Royal Naval Division and has gone to the Crystal Palace to train. Mr. Hill’s son, Ivor, has received his discharge after a remarkable career in the fighting line. Ivor is not sixteen years of age yet, and has been through all the dust up in the Dardanelles. Some red tape business on the part of the authorities induced his father to withdraw this young soldier from the ranks. However, Mr. Hill has been patriotic enough to send another son to fill his place.

13 May 1916 – PRIVATE IVOR HILL.
Pte Ivor Hill

Pte Ivor Hill

Private Ivor Hill is the son of Mr. George Hill, Fruiterer, Mountain Ash. We venture to think it would be hard to break his record. On October 1st, 1914, he was only 14 years and nine months old when he enlisted in the 6th Dragoon Guards, and afterwards transferred to the 3rd South Wales Borderers. He spent four months in the Dardanelles, having landed al Cape Helles, Y Beach, and was in the memorable charge on August 21st, 1915, when the 3rd South Wales Borderers were so badly cut up. This engagement lasted the whole of August 21st and to the evening of the 22nd. His rifle was broken in two, and the bullet which did the damage took part of his knuckle off. Before reaching the age of 16 his parents drew the military authorities’ attention to his age, and he received his discharge on November 11th, 1915, having served one year and 42 days with the colours. His discharge papers give his age as 15 years and 11 months. Private Hill is an exceedingly smart youth, and a splendid horseman. It would be interesting to know if this record can be broken from a point of age.

19 January 1918 – Mountain Ash. IN HARNESS AGAIN.

Mountain Ash is truly proud of its young townsman Ivor Hill, son of Mr and Mrs Geo. Hill, Miskin Road. Ivor, when just turned 15 years, joined voluntarily the Army and went through all the horrors of the Gallipoli campaign. Then he was discharged on account of his youth. His brother Herbert then joined, and in France received such severe wounds that he has now been pensioned off. Ivor, however, disappeared about a month ago, and has now turned up on his first leave a full blown seaman, attached to the R.N.V.R. Good luck.

2 November 1918 – OFF THE BRINY.

Just home on leave is Gunner Ivor Hill of His Majesty’s Navy after a lengthy search for German Unterseeschwine. Ivor’s training in the Gallipoli campaign, before he was 16 years of age, has stood him in good stead. He is the son of Mr and Mrs Geo. Hill, Cardiff Road.

(See also my article about Ivor Hill which includes additional research.)

Pte. A. Hillman

11 November 1916 – Pte. A. Hillman
Pte. A. Hillman

Pte. A. Hillman

Pte. A. Hillman, 13th Div. Cyclist Co., Mesopotamia. Pte. Hillman is the son of Mr. Charles W. Hillman, 3 Ford Level Cottages, Newtown, Mountain Ash, and the grandson of Mr. W. Bowden. He writes home to say he is in Bombay Hospital with malaria, at least that is what the doctors said at first. Coming down the Tigris he had a rough time on the barge, aching all over. After being in the malaria hut for 8 days he was sent to the enteric hut. He was at a place mentioned in the Bible called Sad-um-anger-mora, and the Garden of Eden is a little higher up than Amara. He has improved in health. Pte. Hillman joined the Army on Aug. 10, 1914. After 12 months training in England he saw 6 months active service on the Gallipoli peninsula and 4 months in Egypt.

Pte Wm. Hobby

9 November 1918 – “Pte Wm. Hobby, R.W.F.”
Pte Wm. Hobby, R.W.F.

Pte Wm. Hobby, R.W.F.

Pte Wm. Hobby, R.W.F., who was killed in action in France on October 8th last. He was the son of Mr and Mrs Arthur Hobby, 28 Coplestone Street, Mountain Ash, and grandson of Mrs Roach, 3 Henry Street. He joined the army six months ago, and had only been six weeks on active service. L-Cpl Richard, writing to the parents, says that Hobby was his pal and that he died immediately. “He was the best mate we ever had,” continues the L-Cpl, “and you have the platoon’s deepest sympathy.”

UK, Soldiers Died in the Great War, 1914-1919

Name: David William Hobby
Birth Place: Hereford
Death Date: 8 Oct 1918
Death Place: France and Flanders
Enlistment Place: Mountain Ash, Glam.
Rank: Private
Regiment: The Royal Welsh (Welch) Fusiliers
Battalion: 17th Battalion
Regimental Number: 993666
Type of Casualty: Killed in action
Theatre of War: Western European Theatre
Comments: Formerly 49300, South Wales Borderers.

Private Simon Hughes

4 May 1918 – “Died of Wounds.”
Private Simon Hughes

Private Simon Hughes

Mrs Edwards, of 56 Woodfield Terrace, Penrhiwceiber, has received information from the War Office that her son, Private Simon Hughes, died at Hospital in Belgium from shell wounds. He was an old Territorial, and served in the Dardanelles with the 5th Welsh, and was invalided home. He served in France with the Northumberland Fusiliers for the last 18 months. Prior to the war he was employed at Nixon’s Navigation Colliery, and was well known in football circles, having played for Miskin United A.F.C.

UK, Soldiers Died in the Great War, 1914-1919

Name: Simon Hughes
Birth Place: Mountain Ash, Glam.
Death Date: 14 Apr 1918
Death Place: France and Flanders
Enlistment Place: Mountain Ash
Rank: Private
Regiment: Northumberland Fusiliers
Battalion: 9th Battalion
Regimental Number: 44973
Type of Casualty: Died of wounds
Theatre of War: Western European Theatre
Comments: Formerly 43, A.C.C.

QMS Wm. Gordon Hutchings

19 December 1914 – BIG PROMOTION FOR MOUNTAIN ASH RECRUIT.

In the Gazette announcements of commissions for H.M. Army appears the following:- Mr W. Gordon Hutchings, A.S.C., as Quarter Master Sergeant. Mr. Hutchings was employed at Great Western Railway, Mountain Ash, as goods clerk from November, 1913, to Sept., 1914, when he enlisted in Kitchener’s Army. He was transferred at once to Aldershot. Only a fortnight or so ago we heard of his promotion to Full Corporal. The Army paper, in copying the announcement, states that he is the youngest Q.M S. at Aldershot, being only 22 years old; and from enquiries since made we believe he is the youngest man holding this post in the whole active army. Mr Hutchings is a native of Pembroke Dock. His family has been connected with the Dockyard for two or three generations, and in looking over the Pembroke Dock records put together at the Centenary celebrations held last summer, we find that his great-grandfather saw Napoleon I. on the “Belorston” in Plymouth Sound in 1815, and gave his impressions of him. The new G.M.S. [?] was employed a few years at Merthyr and Aberfan before his transfer to Mountain Ash. He is of a very unassuming manner. When he enlisted he went to Aberdare rather than to the Mount Recruiting Office, where he would be easily “spotted.” He was disappointed there – being rejected, but nothing daunted he went to Cardiff the same day, and there was accepted. This is the spirit that will win battles, and is a sure sign of success in any profession. He was a prime factor in the Cosmo Club, and a member of their football and cricket section. Last winter he showed himself no amateur in ring craft, and was a dead shot at the miniature rifle range.

24 December 1914 – “Quick Promotion.”
QMS Wm Gordon Hutchings

QMS Wm Gordon Hutchings

The subject of our sketch is Quarter Master Sergeant Wm. Gordon Hutchings, Mountain Ash, who joined Kitchener’s Army in September. His smartness has carried him from Private to Q.M.S. in less than 3 months. He is the youngest holding that rank in the British Army.

27 February 1915 – WAR MEMS FROM THE MOUNT.

Cosmo Soldiers. . . .Q.M.S.
Gordon Hutchings writes from Pangbourne. “We certainly are on the last lap now. Just starting on a 150 mile tour with destination a seaport. All quite fit and anxious to beat them.” Gordon always was a smart young man. He persuaded the authorities to make him a Q.M.S. in 12 weeks.
. . .

8 May 1915 – WAR MEMS FROM THE MOUNT.

A Cosmo Q.M. Sergt.- Q.M. Sergt. Hutchings, A.S.C., writes from Folkestone: “How tiresome the delay seems. We can look over to France and almost see our brothers at Boulogne as they come back from the front, and almost sniff the powder, but still the order to join does not come. There is a rumour that we shall be off to the Dardanelles or Egypt soon. Let us hope it is true, for we all feel so fit and anxious to be up and at the enemy.’

13 November 1915 – War Mems from the Mount.

Cosmos at the Front. Letters from Cosmo soldiers were read at the Club at the last meeting. Qtr. Master Sergt. Gordon Hutchings;, A.S.C., complains of the mud in France, which is more of a nuisance than the shells. “A few nights ago,” he relates, my horse bolted and eventually stumbled into a huge shell hole. The job of getting clear of the mud was far worse than the shock of falling off.”
. . .

27 November 1915 – War Mems from the Mount.

Good Old Gordon. Quarter Master Sergt. Gordon Hutchings, one of the fighting pals of the G.W.R., Mountain Ash, writes of some of his experiences in France. He hopes to have a bit of leave at Christmas – so say all of us.

Other pages: A-C, D-EI-L, M-O, P-S, T-Y
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One response to “World War One: Mountain Ash and Penrhiwceiber, F-H

  1. Pingback: Ivor Hill: The Boy Soldier Who Went To Sea | silenced harp

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