World War One: Mountain Ash and Penrhiwceiber, M-O

Sources: The Aberdare Leader 1914-1919; UK Soldiers Died in the Great War, 1914-1919, published by His Majesty’s Stationery Office.

Index and notes

Other pages: A-C, D-E, F-H, I-LP-S, T-Y

Pte. Joe Maggs

7 April 1917 – Pte. Joe Maggs, Welsh Guards
Pte. Joe Maggs, Welsh Guards

Pte. Joe Maggs, Welsh Guards

Pte. Joe Maggs, Welsh Guards, who was severely wounded in the leg at Givenchy last September, and has just returned to his depot, is the eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. Maggs, of 26 Arnold Street, Mountain Ash, and is the first Welsh Guards hero to return to Caegarw. He was the recipient of numerous gifts, including a silver wrist watch from friends and neighbours; also a silver cigarette case from the Wounded Heroes’ Fund. He returned to his depot in Kent on Thursday, March 29th, for ten days’ sick leave.

24 August 1918 – SOLDIER WOUNDED.

Mr and Mrs Maggs, Arnold Street, have just heard that their son, Pte J. Maggs, 1st Welsh Guards, has been severely wounded in the right knee, left hand, and nose. He is now in a Boulogne Hospital.

Pte. Albert Mansell

4 December 1915 – “Ceiberite Killed in the Dardenelles.”
Pte. Albert Mansell, 5th Batt., Dorset Regt.

Pte. Albert Mansell, 5th Batt., Dorset Regt.

Pte. Albert Mansell, 5th Batt., Dorset Regt., who was killed in the Dardenelles, August 21, 1915. His widow and children live in Church Street, Penrhiwceiber.

UK, Soldiers Died in the Great War, 1914-1919

Name: Albert Henry Mansell
Birth Place: Harbone, Worcester
Death Date: 21 Aug 1915
Death Place: France and Flanders
Enlistment Place: Penrhiwceiber, Glam.
Rank: Private
Regiment: Dorsetshire Regiment
Battalion: 5th Battalion
Regimental Number: 12386
Type of Casualty: Killed in action
Theatre of War: Western European Theatre
Comments: Or Since.

Sergt. Ike Mansfield

24 November 1917 – “Sergeant’s Death.”

News has been received by the relatives of Sergt. Ike Mansfield’s death in action. The gallant lad was in the R.W.F., and his home is at Harcourt Terrace, Penrhiwceiber. He leaves a wife and one child.

8 December 1917 – Family Notices

Acknowledgments.

MANSFIELD.- Mr. and Mrs. Charles Mansfield, 46 Strand Street, Newtown, Mountain Ash, desire to thank all who sent messages of sympathy in the death of their dear son, Sergt. I. Mansfield.

15 December 1917 – “Sergt. IKE MANSFIELD. R.W.F.”
Sergt. Ike Mansfield

Sergt. Ike Mansfield

Killed in action, as reported in a recent issue of the “Leader,” leaves a wife and child, who reside at Harcourt Terrace, Penrhiwceiber.

UK, Soldiers Died in the Great War, 1914-1919

Name: Isaac Mansfield
Birth Place: Llanwonno, Glam.
Death Date: 26 Oct 1917
Death Place: France and Flanders
Enlistment Place: Mountain Ash
Rank: Sergeant
Regiment: Machine Gun Corps
Battalion: (Infantry)
Regimental Number: 19186
Type of Casualty: Killed in action
Theatre of War: Western European Theatre
Comments: Formerly 17492, R.W. Fus.

Gunner George H. Marshall

29 January 1916 – Mountain Ash.

INTERMENT.- The funeral of the late Mrs. Sarah Ellen Marshall, mother of Gunner Marshall, R.F.A., 29 Coplestone Street, took place in Caegarw Cemetery last Friday afternoon. The mourners were Mr. and Mrs. Roberts, daughter; Mrs. G. H. Marshall, daughter-in-law; Mr. and Mrs. Warton, brother, Mr. and Mrs. Vanstone, brother; Miss Maud Vanstone, niece; Mr. E. Furlong, Mr. F. Furlong, Mr. J. Prosser, Mr. W. Cooper, Mr. and Mrs. Bartlett. The officiating minister was the Vicar. Gunner G. H. Marshall is serving with the colours in France. The funeral arrangements were carried out by Mr. Frank Mills and Mr. David Evans.

26 October 1918 – KILLED IN ACTION.

The sad news has reached Mrs. Marshall, of 27 Coplestone Street, Mountain Ash, that her husband, Gunner G. H. Marshall, paid the supreme sacrifice in France on the 12th September by the bursting of shell. He was 27 years of age, and had served for four years in France. He was wounded three times and was badly gassed on one occasion. Previous to joining the colours he was a miner at the Cwmcynon Colliery. He leaves a widow and three children, with whom the greatest sympathy is felt.

23 November 1918 – KILLED.

Mrs. Marshall, 29 Coplestone Street, has received news that her husband, Gunner Geo. H. Marshall, R.F.A., died from wounds received in action on October 12th. He joined the army four years ago voluntarily, and was previously wounded three times. Marshall was 29 years of age and leaves a widow and three children. He was a collier at Cwmcynon Pit.

30 November 1918 – Gunner George H. Marshall, R.F.A.
Gunner George H. Marshall, R.F.A.

Gunner George H. Marshall, R.F.A.

Gunner George H. Marshall, R.F.A., who has died from wounds. He was the son of Mrs. Marshall, 29 Coplestone St., Mountain Ash.

UK, Soldiers Died in the Great War, 1914-1919

Name: George H. Marshall
Residence: Treharris, Glam
Death Date: 12 Oct 1918
Death Place: France and Flanders
Enlistment Place: Treharris, Glam.
Rank: Gunner
Regiment: Royal Horse Artillery and Royal Field Artillery
Regimental Number: 2944
Type of Casualty: Died of wounds
Theatre of War: Western European Theatre

Seaman Harry Martin

24 June 1916 – Mountain Ash. CLARENCE STREET SAILORS.

Seaman H. T. Martin, youngest son of Mr. and Mrs. Martin, and Seaman Ivor Weaver, son of Mr and Mrs S. Weaver, both of Clarence Street, Miskin, received a hearty welcome home. They are warm friends in private life and not less so as pals in H.M. Navy. They have seen service for many months abroad. Their friends gathered round them and gave them a real send-off when they returned to their respective ships.

9 September 1916 – Miskin

OBITUARY. Mr. Henry Martin, aged 62 years, of 15 Clarence Street, passed away on Monday morning. Deceased was taken suddenly ill in the street at Mountain Ash on Saturday evening. He was a native of Bristol, and came to Glamorgan 30 years ago. He leaves a sorrowing wife and five children. One son is serving in the Navy. We extend our sympathy to the family.

8 September 1917 – Family Notices

IN MEMORIAM.

MARTIN.- In ever-loving memory of Henry Thomas Martin, beloved husband of Harriet Martin, 15 Clarence St., Miskin, who passed peacefully away Sept. 4th, 1916. Age, 62 years. Also of Harry, youngest son of the above, who lost his life on H.M.S. Destroyer in the North Sea on March 1st, 1917. Age, 22 years.

How we miss their loving presence,
In our home as time rolls on,
None but those who’ve lost their loved ones
Can feel the bitterness of ‘Gone.’

-Deeply mourned by us all.

2 March 1918 – “IN DEATH NOT DIVIDED.”
Seaman Harry Martin

Seaman Harry Martin

Saint David’s Day recalls sad memories to the home of Seaman Harry Martin, son of the late Henry Martin and Mrs. Martin, of 15 Clarence Street, Miskin, who lost his life on March 1st, 1917, whilst serving on H.M.S. Destroyer “Pheasant” in the North Sea.Before joining the navy in August, 1915, he worked at Nixon’s Navigation Colliery, and also had great delight in attending the St. John Ambulance and the British Red Cross Society. He passed and received certificates from both. He was well known at Miskin and had many friends.

Seaman Ivor T Weaver

Seaman Ivor T Weaver

Seaman Ivor Thomas Weaver, a pal of Seaman Harry Martin, both joined the Navy at the same time and lost their lives in the same battle. Weaver was a collier in private life, and was the son of Mr. and Mrs. D.E.S. Weaver, 1 Clarence Street, Miskin.

2 March 1918 – Family Notices

IN MEMORIAM.

MARTIN.- In ever-loving memory of our dear Harry, who lost his life on H.M. Destroyer in the North Sea on March 1st, 1917. Aged 22 years.

Lead kindly light, amid the encircling gloom,
Lead thou me on;
The night is dark, and I am far from home,
Lead thou me on.
And with the morn those angel faces smile,
Which I have loved long since and lost awhile.
-Ever remembered by Mother, Sisters and Brothers.

1 March 1919 – Family Notices

IN MEMORIAM.

MARTIN.- In ever loving remembrance of Harry, youngest son ot the late Henry Martin, and Mrs. Martin, of 15 Clarence Street, Miskin, who lost his life on H.M.S. Pheasant, on March 1st. 1917. Aged 22 years.- Tho’ lost from sight. to memory ever dear.- Sadly missed by his loving mother, sister and brothers.

Lance Corporal David Masters

28 November 1914 – WAR MEMS FROM THE MOUNT

Engineers.- . . . To the Royal Engineers, Welsh Army Corps, Messrs Idris Lloyd, architect; Alfred Jago, son of Mr W. C. Jago, Bertie Eynon, Aberaman Offices, and David Masters, engineer, have been drafted.

11 March 1916 – Up and down the valley. Mountain Ash

THE FUNERAL of the late Mr. John Masters, Glenbrook, Miskin, took place at Maesyrarian Cemetery on Tuesday evening. Deceased was 54 years of age, and a highly respected citizen. For many years he was the proprietor of the Bailey’s Inn, and was at one time chairman of the District Licensed Victuallers’ Association. He leaves a widow, two sons and three daughters. The body was taken to St. John’s Church, where a short service was conducted by the Rev. D. E. Roberts, assisted by the Rev. D. J. Wills, Aberdare. The “Dead March” from “Saul” was played by Mr. Stanley Gregory. The mourners were: Widow; Private Tom Masters; (Lance-Corporal David Masters not able to reach home in time from France). . . .

20 May 1916 – Mountain Ash. Notice of death.

A War Office report of the death of Private D. Masters, Mountain Ash, Shropshire Light Infantry, appeared in a Cardiff contemporary. We understand that this does not refer to the son of the late Mr. John Masters and Mrs. Masters, Bailey Street, Miskin.

17 June 1916 – MISKIN. SEND-OFF.

Lance-Corporal D. R. Masters, son of Mrs. and the late Mr John Masters, of Glanbrook Cottage, on Thursday evening returned to the firing line after spending a few days at home. Prior to enlistment he was a popular member of the Penrhiwceiber Guild, A.S.F.C. He was given a rousing send-off.

22 July 1916 – OUR HEROES.

Official news has been received by Mrs. Masters, Bailey Street, Miskin, of the death in action of her son, Pte. David Masters., Royal Engineers, Welsh Army Corps. Lance Corpl. F. G. Woodland, Leicester Regt., son of Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Woodland, Victoria Street, Miskin, has died from wounds received in action.

29 July 1916 – “How a Miskin Soldier Died.”
Lance Corp David Masters, RE

Lance Corp David Masters, RE

Appended is a letter received by Mrs. Masters, Glenbrook, Bailey Street, Miskin, late of the Bailey’s Arms, on the death of her son, Lance Corporal David Masters, R.E., from the Commanding Officer of his Company:- “I have the painful duty to report that your son, Lance Corporal D. Masters, was killed in action on the 11th inst. The majority of the men in the section were taking cover in a trench, which the enemy commenced to shell. Masters and another Sapper were killed instantaneously by a shell in spite of having taken every possible cover. We as a Company feel the loss of your son acutely, as he was an extremely popular N.C.O., and always did his duty. I ask you to accept the deepest sympathy of every officer, N.C.O. and man in the company, and may you as a family be granted strength to bear this terrible loss.- Lieut. Geo. McLean.”

Lance Corpl. Masters, whose death we reported last week, was only 24 years of age. Prior to his enlisting at the outbreak of war he was employed as assistant surveyor at the Abercynon Colliery. He was an ardent cricketer and footballer, having played two seasons for the Penrhiwceiber Guild A.F.C. He was very popular in the district. Much sympathy is felt for the widowed mother and family.

UK, Soldiers Died in the Great War, 1914-1919

Name: David Masters
Birth Place: Llanwonno, Glam.
Death Date: 11 Jul 1916
Death Place: France and Flanders
Enlistment Place: Mountain Ash, Glam.
Rank: Corporal
Regiment: Royal Engineers
Regimental Number: 62477
Type of Casualty: Killed in action
Theatre of War: Western European Theatre
Comments: 123Rd Field Coy., R.E.

14 July 1917 – Family Notices

IN MEMORIAM.

MASTERS.- In loving memory of David Robert (Dave), 123rd Field Coy., Royal Engineers, dearly loved eldest son of the late John and Mrs. Masters, Glenbrook, Mountain Ash, who died for us at Mametz Wood on July 11, 1916.
“Not to question why or how?
Only bow, only bow.”
Deeply mourned and sadly missed by his sorrowing mother and sisters.

MASTERS.- In loving memory of my dear and only brother, Dave, 123rd Field Coy., Royal Engineers, who made the great sacrifice at Mametz Wood on July 11th, 1916. “Though death divides, fond memories cling.” – Sadly missed and mourned by Tom, Somewhere in France.

13 July 1918 – Family Notices

IN MEMORIAM.

MASTERS.- In loving memory of our darling boys, Dave who died at Mametz, July 11th. 1916, and Tom, who died near Bapaume, March 23rd, 1918, only sons of the late John and Mrs Masters, Glenbrook, Mountain Ash.

What happy hours we once enjoyed;
How sweet those memories still;
But they have left an aching void
Which none will ever fill .

22 March 1919

IN MEMORIAM.

MASTERS.- In loving memory of my dear chum, Tom Masters, Glenbrook, Mountain Ash, killed in action, March 23rd, 1918.
There is a link death cannot sever,
Love and remembrance last for ever.
– From Id.

MASTERS.- In loving memory of our darling boys, Tom, who died near Bapaume, March 23rd, 1918, and Dave, who died at Mametz, July 11th, 1916, only sons of Mrs. Masters, and the late John Masters, Glenbrook, Mountain Ash. – Too dearly loved ever to be forgotten by mother and sisters.

Private Wm. McCoy

2 October 1915 – Penrhiwceiber. DIED IN THE DARDANELLES.

The death has occurred in action in the Dardanelles of Private Wm. McCoy, 5th Connaught Rangers. Pte. McCoy enlisted on the 14th September, 1914, and went into action on the 21st of August this year. He was only permitted to be in the trenches eight days when he met his death on August 29th. He lived at 14 Pentwyn Avenue, and leaves a widow and seven children, all of them young. McCoy was 37 years old. Our sympathy is extended to Mrs McCoy and family.

09 October 1915 – Private Wm. McCoy, of Penrhiwceiber
Pte Wm McCoy, Penrhiwceiber

Pte Wm McCoy, Penrhiwceiber

Private Wm. McCoy, of Penrhiwceiber, 5th Connaught Rangers. Killed on August 29th 1915, at the Dardenelles.

UK, Soldiers Died in the Great War, 1914-1919

Name: William McCoy
Birth Place: Aberdare, Glam.
Residence: Penrhiwceiber, Glam.
Death Date: 29 Aug 1915
Death Place: Gallipoli
Enlistment Place: Mountain Ash
Rank: Private
Regiment: Connaught Rangers
Battalion: 5th Battalion
Regimental Number: 606
Type of Casualty: Died of wounds
Theatre of War: Balkan Theatre

Pte. D. G. Meredith

26 May 1917 – Pte. D. G. Meredith
Pte. D. G. Meredith

Pte. D. G. Meredith

This is a photo of Pte. D. G. Meredith, 1/5 Welsh Regiment, who joined the Army about 12 months ago, and in a short time was sent out to Egypt. Before joining he lived at 18 Allen Street, Mountain Ash. He was wounded at Gaza on the 26th March. His friends have received the news that he was at a convalescent hospital at Boulac, and was expecting to be discharged therefrom in a week’s time. His brother Dan has been serving in France since the beginning of the war. Their many friends wish them the best of luck and a safe return home.

Private Morgan Miles

12 August 1916 – “Two Aberdare Valley Heroes”
Seated, Pte Miles, left, Pte Gibbon, right

Seated, Pte Miles, left, Pte Gibbon, right

On Sunday last Private Morgan Miles, of the 1st Dorsets, attached now to the R.E., came home from the firing line. He was gassed at Hill 60, and has been three times buried in mine saps. He was at the battle of Ypres, Givenchy, and many other engagements. He was one of the first from Miskin to respond to his country’s call. He relates many interesting tales of his experiences in the trenches. He was at Mametz Wood last month, and was fortunate to come through unscathed. He is 29 years of age. Private Miles has brought home a good collection of curios and relics. On Wednesday lie returned to the firing line. He was given a grand send-off by his numerous Miskin friends.

[See also Tom Gibbon.]

The portrait represents: Sitting, Private Miles (left) and Private Gibbon (right). Standing is a comrade, a Doncaster corporal.

Bomb. Geo. Mitchell

4 August 1917 – “Miskin Son’s Heroic Death.”
Bomb. Geo, Mitchell, R.F.A.

Bomb. Geo, Mitchell, R.F.A.

An only son of Miskin parents, Mr. and Mrs. George Mitchell, 12 Glancynon Street, Miskin, has fallen in action. Last week they received information that Bomb. Geo. Mitchell. R.F.A., had fallen in France. The following letter was received from his officer: “I regret to advise you of the death in action of your son George. This occurred yesterday evening (July 18th). He was struck by a piece of shell and died almost instantly, losing consciousness the moment he was hit. He was not in any way disfigured. We buried him in a British Cemetery this afternoon, officers and men attending to pay their last respect. Your son died the death of a hero. When he heard a shell coming he shouted to the man next to him to look-out, and then threw himself across the other man, thereby saving the latter’s life by receiving the piece of shell in his own body. Such a spirit of sacrifice cannot be too highly praised, and we in the Battalion are indeed proud of him. We shall feel the loss of your son more than we can say. He served with us ever since we came to this country, Dec., 1915, and I know what splendid qualities were his. He was very popular with all officers and a true comrade to all the men, and we are all quite disheartened at his death. I understand he was your only son, which makes his death all the more sad, but hope you will find a little compensation in the thought that he gave his life for his country.” – A similar letter, referring to Bomb. Mitchell’s act of self-sacrifice,’ was received by the parents from Rev, J. Alban Davies, C.E. Chap. to 38th R.F.A. Deceased joined the Army in January, 1915, prior to which he was employed at Nixon’s Navigation Colliery.

UK, Soldiers Died in the Great War, 1914-1919

Name: George Mitchell
Birth Place: Teignmouth, Devon
Death Date: 18 Jul 1917
Death Place: France and Flanders
Enlistment Place: Mountain Ash, Glam.
Rank: A BDR.
Regiment: Royal Horse Artillery and Royal Field Artillery
Regimental Number: W/1016
Type of Casualty: Killed in action
Theatre of War: Western European Theatre

Signaller Dan Morgan

06 November 1915 – “Two Miskin Pals.”

. . . [See also Signaller D. Lawrence]

Signaller D Morgan, Miskin

Signaller D Morgan, Miskin

Signaller Dan Morgan, also in the East Yorks, is the son of Mrs. George Morgan, 9 Navigation Villas, Miskin. He is also in France, and is all right.

8 July 1916 – Miskinite Wounded in France.

On Monday last Navigation Villas, Miskin, was gaily decorated to welcome home from the firing line Pte. A. Morgan, of the 8th Batt. East Yorks. He has been discharged from Blackpool Military Convalescent Hospital, where he was attended to after receiving wounds at a battle near St. Eloi in France. Pte. Morgans has been in action for nine months, and was in the battle of Loos. He is now fully recovered and returns shortly. His home is at 9 Navigation Villas.

Lieut Ernest A Morgan

04 September 1915 – “Mountain Ash Lieutenant Killed in Gallipoli.”
Lieut Ernest A Morgan, Mountain Ash

Lieut Ernest A Morgan, Mountain Ash

Official news was received by Mr. Alfred Morgan, Director of Education, Mountain Ash, of the death of his son last Friday. Lt. Morgan died from wounds received in action on the Gallipoli Peninsula. He was 24 years of age, and in private life was a mining surveyor under Messrs. Nixon’s Colliery Co. He formerly belonged to the Volunteers, afterwards enlisting in the 5th Welsh, 1st Batt., as a private. Lt. Morgan was a most popular officer and his early death is deeply deplored by a host of friends. He is the first officer of the 5th Welsh to fall, and the second Mountain Ash officer since the war commenced. The other was Captain Lyndhurst Bruce, eldest son of Lord and Lady Aberdare. Lieut. Morgan was a nephew of the commanding officer, Col. Morgan Morgan, Maesydderwen, Mountain Ash.

Message from the King and Queen.
O.H.M.S., Buckingham Palace.
A. Morgan, Esq., Brynhafod, Mountain Ash.

The King and Queen deeply regret the loss you and the Army have sustained by the death of your son in the service of his country. Their Majesties truly sympathise with you in your sorrow. – Keeper of the Privy Purse.

11 September 1915 – Mountain Ash Education Committee

The Late Lieut. Morgan.

Before proceeding with the business, the chairman moved a vote of condolence with the Director of Education on the death of his son, Lieut. Morgan. They had all heard with much regret, added the chairman, that the Director’s son had been killed in the Dardanelles, and the Education Committee sympathised very much with Mr and Mrs. Morgan and family in their bereavement. There were others outside who had suffered bereavements, and the Education Committee sympathised with all the relatives, and prayed to God to give those who were left to mourn their loss strength to bear the great trial. Mr. Bruce Jones seconded the motion, and added that the news must have been a terrible blow to the family, and indeed it was a blow to himself (Mr. Jones). The only measure of consolation left to the family was that their son had done his duty nobly and had died in the service of his king and country. He was sure that as time went on Mr. and Mrs. Morgan would look back on this bereavement with a proud spirit as they remembered that one of their sons had fallen while doing his duty in this great and terrible war. The motion was carried in the usual way, and the Director thanked the members.

UK, Soldiers Died in the Great War, 1914-1919

Name: Ernest Alfred Morgan
Death Date: 21 Aug 1915
Rank: Lieutenant
Regiment: Welsh Regiment
Battalion: 5th Battalion (Territorial)
Type of Casualty: Died of wounds

Pte R. H. Morgan

30 November 1918 – “Pte. R. H. Morgan, Penrhiwceiber.”
Pte. R. H. Morgan, Penrhiwceiber

Pte. R. H. Morgan, Penrhiwceiber

This is a photo of Pte R. H. Morgan, King’s Liverpool Regiment, who died of broncho pneumonia at Salonica. He enlisted in February, 1915, and had been on active service for two and a half years. Previous to enlisting he was employed at Penrhiwceiber Colliery. He was a member of the Mountain Ash Volunteer Band for over seven years. Pte Morgan, who was 34 years of age, leaves a widow and three children, who reside at 59 Tanycoed Street, Penrhiwceiber. He was admitted into hospital on the 27th of October; and died on the 29th. Mrs. Morgan has received the following letter from deceased’s officer:- “Dear Madam,- It is with a feeling of deep regret that I have to inform you that your husband passed away at a hospital in Salonica. I offer you my deepest sympathy in your sad bereavement. I personally feel the loss very keenly, as he was in my Company. He was an excellent fellow, always bright and ready to help to entertain his comrades whenever he could. They will miss him greatly for he did valuable work for our Concert Party, and Was always popular. Please convey my deep sympathy to all his relatives. I trust that you will be given strength to bear the burden of sorrow that this letter must inevitably bring you. – Yours sincerely, Frank W. Cranmer (Captain).”

UK, Soldiers Died in the Great War, 1914-1919

Name: Robert Henry Morgan
Birth Place: Liverpool
Residence: Penrhiwceiber, Glam.
Death Date: 29 Oct 1918
Death Place: Salonika
Enlistment Place: Mountain Ash, Glam.
Rank: Private
Regiment: The King’s (Liverpool) Regiment
Battalion: 2nd (Garrison) Battalion
Regimental Number: 54043
Type of Casualty: Died
Theatre of War: Balkan Theatre
Comments: Formerly 30636, Welch Regiment.

Sapper Tom Morgan

7 September 1918 – “Miskin Soldier Fallen.”

Mr. and Mrs. Morgan, 49 Bailey Street, Miskin, received official intimation on Tuesday, Sept. 4, that their son, Sapper Tom Morgan had been killed in France. He joined up a month after war broke out, when he was only I8 years of age, and was drafted to France 3 years ago. He belonged to the Royal Engineers. He was gassed three months ago on his 22nd birthday, but recovered in a short time. Prior to joining up, he was a collier at Glyn Gwyn Level, Miskin. A brother, Sergt. Major Wm. Morgan has been in France for 9 months but is now in Pembrokeshire.

7 September 1918 – Family Notices

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS.

MORGAN.- Mr and Mrs Morgan and family, 49 Bailey Street, Mountain Ash, beg to thank most sincerely the many friends who sent them kind letters of sympathy in their bereavement through the death in action of their son, Sapper Thomas Howell Morgan.

21 September 1918 – “Sapper Tom Morgan, R.E.”
Sapper Tom Morgan, R.E.

Sapper Tom Morgan, R.E.

This brave young man, who was killed on August 22nd, was a pal of those two brave soldier sons of Mrs. Masters, both of them having made the supreme sacrifice. Morgan was as a boy a chorister of St. John’s, Miskin, and was a member of the St. Teilo’s Billiard Team. He fell in a gallant charge in the early hours of the morning of Aug. 22nd. He had asked his pal if anything happened to him, to write to his mother, and had actually addressed the envelope himself, these being the last words he wrote. He lived only about 3 minutes after being knocked over and is buried at the back of lines.

21 September 1918 – “MISKIN PARISH CHURCH.”

A memorial service was conducted on Sunday evening at St. John’s Church by Rev. J. LI. Davies, to honour the memory of Sapper Tom Morgan, an old chorister. Special hymns were sung, and the Vicar preached an impressive sermon.

UK, Soldiers Died in the Great War, 1914-1919

Name: Thomas Howell Morgan
Birth Place: Rhymney, Mon.
Death Date: 22 Aug 1918
Death Place: France and Flanders
Enlistment Place: Mountain Ash, Glam.
Rank: SPR.
Regiment: Royal Engineers
Regimental Number: 45666
Type of Casualty: Killed in action
Theatre of War: Western European Theatre
Comments: 80Th Field Coy., R.E.

23 August 1919 – Family Notices

IN MEMORIAM.

MORGAN.- In loving remembrance of Sapper Thomas Howell Morgan, beloved son of Mr. and Mrs. James Morgan, 49 Bailey Street, Miskin, who fell near Albert, on August 22nd 1918.- Ever remembered by mother and father and family.- Too dearly loved to be forgotten.

[The same text, slightly altered, also appears on 30 August 1919.]

Private William J. Morgan

07 October 1916 – Private William J. Morgan, R.F.A.
Private William J. Morgan, R.F.A.

Private William J. Morgan, R.F.A.

This is a photo of Private William J. Morgan, R.F.A., of Penrhiwceiber, who died in Mesopotamia. He was a member of the Penrhiwceiber Windsors A.F.C., and Mr. E. Williams, Secretary of the Club, has sent a very touching message of condolence to Private Morgan’s parents.

UK, Soldiers Died in the Great War, 1914-1919

Name: William James Morgan
Birth Place: Penrhiwceiber
Death Date: 8 Sep 1916
Death Place: Mesopotamia
Enlistment Place: Mountain Ash, Glam.
Rank: Gunner
Regiment: Royal Horse Artillery and Royal Field Artillery
Regimental Number: 112760
Type of Casualty: Died
Theatre of War: Asiatic Theatres

Thomas Morris

13 January 1917 – Penrhiwceiber. ON FURLOUGH.

Air Mechanic Thomas Morris, Royal Flying Corps, of Quarry House, arrived home on Saturday night for a ten days’ leave, this being his first leave since he enlisted. He joined the Royal Flying Corps 14 months ago, being the first local recruit to join this corps. He was in England for the first week after enlistment, after which he was transferred to Ireland, and thence to France, where he has been for 13 months. He is now serving with the Advance Echelon of the Flying Corps, and during his time in France has had many thrilling experiences. He returns on Monday next.

7 July 1917 – Thomas Morris, Royal Flying Corps.
Thomas Morris, Royal Flying Corps.

Thomas Morris, Royal Flying Corps.

Above is the photo of Wireless Mechanic Thomas Morris, Royal Flying Corps., who was promoted 1st Class Air Mechanic a month ago whilst on active service. He enlisted in November, 1915, as a Second Air Mechanic, and was sent to France within a month, where he has been since. He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. W. Morris, Quarry House, Penrhiwceiber. Prior to enlistment he was employed in the lamproom at the Penrikyber Colliery.

Drummer D. Moynihan

02 October 1915 – “Victoria Street’s Heroes.”
Drummer Moynihan and his mother

Drummer Moynihan and his mother

On Sunday, September 12th, Drummer D. Moynihan, of the 2nd Leinster Regiment, returned home from France on four days’ leave. He has been in action since the beginning of the war. Victoria Street, Miskin, where his mother resides, was gaily decorated with flags and lanterns by the residents, who gave Drummer Moynihan a hearty reception. Although he has spent a year in the thick of the fighting he has not yet been wounded or otherwise disabled. Mrs. Brown (his mother) has two other sons and a son-in-law serving the colours. One of them, Pte. T. Moynihan, Somerset Light Infantry, who has also been in action a year, is expected home on leave at the end of the month. Drummer D. Moynihan returned to France on Thursday, Sept. 16th. We wish him God-speed and a safe return after the war. Mrs. Brown wishes to thank all neighbours and friends for giving her son such a nice reception.

UK, Soldiers Died in the Great War, 1914-1919

Name: Denis Moynihan
Birth Place: Mountain Ash, Glamorgan
Death Date: 18 Aug 1916
Death Place: France and Flanders
Enlistment Place: Mountain Ash, Glamorgan
Rank: Drummer
Regiment: Prince of Wales’s Leinster Regiment (Royal Canadians)
Battalion: 2nd Battalion
Regimental Number: 7674
Type of Casualty: Killed in action
Theatre of War: Western European Theatre

Driver J. J. Nash

6 May 1916 – Miskin. SOLDIER WElCOMED.

A very large number had assembled at the Miskin Inn on Wednesday evening to welcome home from France Pte. J. Nash. Solos were rendered by popular artistes, including Mr. Mog Edwards, Mountain Ash, and Mr. Jacob Richards, Penrhiwceiber. Enthusiastic addresses were delivered.

25 November 1916 – Driver J. J. Nash
Driver J. J. Nash

Driver J. J. Nash

This is a photo of Driver J. J. Nash, of the Royal Engineers, son of Mr. and Mrs. John Nash, blacksmith, 98 [sic] Victoria Street, Miskin, Mountain Ash. This young hero, who is only 19 years of age, has taken part in many fights during his 12 months’ stay in France. He has been also in the thick of the “Big Push” on the Somme since July 6th. Prior to enlisting Driver Nash was employed as underground engine-driver at Cwm Cynon Colliery.

15 September 1917 – Miskin. HOME ON LEAVE.

Private T. J. Nash, Royal Engineers, is home on leave from France. Enlisting in March, 1915, he was in training at Winchester, and was sent to France on December 1st, 1915. He has been through the battles of the Somme and Ypres. He returns on Friday. Private Nash is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Nash, 91 Victoria Street.

Pte. Victor Nicholas

03 June 1916 – “Sympathy with Bereaved Mother.”
Pte Victor Nicholas

Pte Victor Nicholas

The mother of Pte. Victor Nicholas, late Duffryn Gardens, Mountain Ash, has received the following letter from the officer of the Company to which her son belonged:- “My dear Mrs. Nicholas,- I regret to tell you of the death of your son, who was in my Company. He died on the morning of May 1st from wounds received the night before. He was acting as orderly to his section officer, and they were going up a communication trench to the front line. When they were half way up the trench the Germans suddenly started a very heavy bombardment. About the first shell to fall came right in the trench and exploded where your son and his officer were. Your son had his thigh very badly hit, and the officer was wounded in the foot and back. Your son was taken three miles back, but died about 9.45 a.m. from a compound fracture of the thigh. The whole Company sympathise with you in your loss. Your son was a general favourite with all, officers and men, and during the short time he was out proved himself a most excellent soldier. May the knowledge that he died the most glorious death a man can die be a consolation to you in this your great sorrow. Your son was buried in the soldiers’ graveyard in Bray, a town just north of the River Somme. Let me again express my most sincere personal sympathy with you.- I am, Major 54th Co.” Pte. Nicholas, who was formerly in the Somerset Light Infantry, and was transferred to Machine Gun Section, was one of four brothers in the Army.

UK, Soldiers Died in the Great War, 1914-1919

Name: Victor Herbert Nicholas
Birth Place: Beckington, Som.
Death Date: 1 May 1916
Death Place: France and Flanders
Enlistment Place: Mountain Ash
Rank: Private
Regiment: Machine Gun Corps
Battalion: (Infantry)
Regimental Number: 4107
Type of Casualty: Died of wounds
Theatre of War: Western European Theatre
Comments: Formerly 19700, Som. L.I.

Sergt. F. C. Norman

05 June 1915 – “Penrhiwceiber Soldier Mentioned in Dispatches.”
Sergt F C Norman

Sergt F C Norman

Councillor G. H. Hall, Penrhiwceiber, has received several letters from friends at the front concerning Sergt. F. C. Norman, of the Royal Warwickshire Regt., who has been out in France for some months. It appears that after the battle of Neuve Chapelle, the Colonel of that Regt. formed up the members and called out Sergeant Norman, who was told that he had been mentioned in dispatches and recommended for the Distinguished Conduct Medal for bravery in the field.

Sergeant Norman lived in Penrhiwceiber, and was employed at Cwmcynon as a collier. When war was declared he re-enlisted in his old regiment, he having served in it during the South African War. During that war also Sergeant Norman distinguished himself by brave deeds and was awarded the King’s and Queen’s medals with five clasps. He also received the Royal Humane Society medal for saving life in South Africa.

28 August 1915 – “Home on Furlough. Concert Held in Honour of Penrhiwceiber D.C.M.”

Last Friday evening a smoking concert was held at the Lee Hotel, Penrhiwceiber, in honour of Sergt. F. C. Norman. Councillor G. H. Hall presided.

Sergt. Norman belongs to the Royal Warwickshire Regt., and has taken part in several engagements. After the battle of Neuve Chapelle, the colonel of the regiment formed up the members, and called out Sergt. Norman, who was told that he had been mentioned in dispatches and recommended for the Distinguished Conduct Medal for bravery in the field.

Sergt. Norman, who is now home with his wife at 67 Church Street, Penrhiwceiber, on a few days leave, was employed at Cwmcynon Colliery prior to the war. Soon after war was declared he re-enlisted in his old regiment, for he saw service in the South African War, where he distinguished himself and was awarded the King’s and Queen’s medals with five clasps. He also received the Royal Humane Society’s medal for saving life in South Africa.

Sergeant Norman, who is reluctant to speak of the part he has played in the present war, had many a narrow shave, but he has only been for a few weeks in hospital as the result of a small flesh wound. Once the Princess Mary presentation box saved him from being injured by a piece of shell, while on another occasion a piece of shell knocked away his knapsack buckle.

21 October 1916 – Penrhiwceiber. D.C.M. PRESENTED.

On Friday evening last a representative meeting was held at the Workmen’s Hall to present Sergeant F. Norman with a gold hunter watch inscribed as follows:- “Presented to Sergeant F. Norman by the inhabitants of Penrhiwceiber to commemorate the conferring upon him of the D.C.M. for gallantry in the battle of Neuve Chapelle.” Mr. John Bath presided. Mr. John Lodwick handed the gallant hero the gift, and he suitably returned thanks. The chairman o the Committee was Councillor G. H. Hall, J.P. Secretary, Mr. Tom Daniels; treasurer, Mr. John Bath. Sergeant Norman belonged to the Warwickshire Regiment, and has now been discharged. His home is 3 Woodfield Terrace.

Other pages: A-C, D-E, F-H, I-LP-S, T-Y
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