World War One: Mountain Ash and Penrhiwceiber, P-S

Sources: The Aberdare Leader 1914-1919; UK Soldiers Died in the Great War, 1914-1919, published by His Majesty’s Stationery Office.

Index and notes

Other pages: A-C, D-E, F-H, I-L, M-O, T-Y

Private Bert Pearman

21 April 1917 – PENRHIWCEIBER ROLL OF HONOUR. Three Killed and Two Wounded.

We regret to announce the deaths in action in the East of Sergeant J. James Jones, Lance Corporal Benjamin Roper, and Private Herbert Pearman, all of Penrhiwceiber. . . .

Private Herbert Pearman enlisted in the 5th Welsh at the outbreak of war, he having joined the Territorials at the age of 14. He underwent training at Pembroke, Bedford, Tunbridge Wells and Scotland. He was at the Suvla Bay landing. He had not been home for two years. From the Dardanelles he was sent to Egypt, and at Gaza was killed in action. Condolence from the King and Queen was received by his mother, Mrs. Pearman, of 36 Park Street. Deceased was only 19, and was previously employed at Nixon’s Navigation Colliery.
. . .

5 May 1917 – ACKNOWLEDGMENTS.

PEARMAN.- Mr. and Mrs. Pearman, of 36 Park Street, wish to thank their many friends for kind sympathy in the sad bereavement.

5 May 1917 – A NOBLE SON.

Mrs. Pearman, of 36 Park Street, whose son met his death in Gaza, has received the following letter from the Chaplain:- “27th General Hospital, Cairo, April 7th, 1917,- My Dear Mrs. Pearman,- I know with what sorrow you would hear of the death of your fine boy. We do indeed feel for you and remember you and those he loved in prayers. He came into this hospital on Saturday a week to-day, with a wound in the head. He was most happy and comfortable, and I gave him the Holy Communion on Monday morning. I took the funeral at the New Cairo Cemetery on Thursday evening as the sun was setting. His grave is a very nice place beneath shady trees, and he lies beside his brother-soldiers who have given their lives for God and this war. The funeral was, of course, a military one. May God comfort you.- R. F. Edwards.”- Also the mother has received letters from the Battalion Chaplain A. Davies, 1-5th Welsh; Dr. H. V. Leigh, Treharris, and Lieut. W. J. Adams, R.A.M.C. Each refer to the brave soldier as one of the best of the regiment. He was wounded on March 26th, was taken to the hospital to be operated upon on March 31st, and died on April 4th in his 10th [sic] year.

12 May 1917 – Private Bert Pearman
Private Bert Pearman

Private Bert Pearman

Private Bert Pearman, of Penrhiwceiber, who was killed in Gaza.

UK, Soldiers Died in the Great War, 1914-1919

Name: Herbert Pearman
Birth Place: Llanwonno, Glam.
Residence: Penrhiwceiber, Glam.
Death Date: 4 Apr 1917
Death Place: Egypt
Enlistment Place: Mountain Ash
Rank: Private
Regiment: Welsh Regiment
Battalion: 1st 5th Battalion
Regimental Number: 240354
Type of Casualty: Died of wounds
Theatre of War: Egyptian Theatre

Pte. R. Penney

7 August 1915 – “Local Men Want Mouth-Organs.”

We are in receipt of a letter from Privates H. Sly, 13 Broniestyn Terrace, Trecynon; R. Penney, Woodfield Terrace, Penrhiwceiber, and C. Compton, 89 Tyrfelin Street, Miskin. The three are engaged as Machine Gunners in the 1st Batt. Royal Welsh Fusiliers, 22nd Brigade, 7th Division, British Expeditionary Force, France, In their letter they state: “We have great pleasure in informing you that we were fortunate enough the other day to capture a copy of the ‘Aberdare Leader.’ We saw your recruiting page and we thought it ought to buck up a few slackers who are very backward in enlisting. We have seen a few hardships out here, having spent last winter facing the German trenches. We have seen a good many men fall and we want help to drive the Germans back. Your recruiting page will, we are sure, bring a few more into the King’s forces. Dear Sir, we would be obliged to you if you would inform the people of Aberdare and Penrhiwceiber that we would gladly appreciate a few small gifts, such as mouth-organs, etc. We want to entertain our German friends with concerts at night-time in the trenches, as they are only 70 yards away from our section of the line. We hope we won’t upset them by singing their Hymn of Hate, for then they may throw a few bombs at us by way of donations for being so generous as to provide them with music. We would be pleased to see our photos in the recruiting page of the ‘Aberdare Leader.'”

28 August 1915 – Pte. R. Penney, Machine Gunner, 1st Batt.. R.W.F.
Pte. R. Penney, Penrhiwceiber

Pte. R. Penney, Penrhiwceiber

Pte. R. Penney, Machine Gunner, 1st Batt.. R.W.F., son of Mrs. W. Penney, 45 Woodf[i]eld Terrace, Penrhiwceiber. He has been out in the trenches since last November, and has emerged from a host of engagements unscathed. A letter signed jointly by Pte. Penney and two companions appeared in our issue of Aug. 7th.

Lance-Corporal Harold Llewelyn Phillips

8 December 1917 – “Penrhiwceiber Medallist Killed.”
Lance Corpl H Ll Phillips, MM

Lance Corpl H Ll Phillips, MM

News has been received of the death in action on November 20th of Lance-Corporal Harold Llewelyn Phillips, M.M., Lancashire Fusiliers, eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. T. E. Phillips. The following letter has been received from his officer: “Dear Mrs. Phillips,- It is my painful duty to write you explaining the circumstances of your son Harold’s death, on the early morning of the 20th. We had been relieved, and on our way back to billets, Harold, with others, was struck with a shell. He suffered no pain; in fact- I was unable to find a mark on his body. His face looked quite peaceful. He was a dear boy. I knew him so well having been my servant for some time, when the Commanding Officer wanted him for an N.C.O. owing to his smartness. I was waiting for papers coming through to send him home on Commission. Unfortunately, God willed it otherwise. You will have the comfort that your son died a glorious death, doing his duty for his country. For one so young he was a noble boy, and is sadly missed by all his officers and men of D. Company. With very deepest sympathy with you in your grief.- J. Edgar, 2nd Lt. D. Coy., 2/8 Lancashire Fusiliers.” Lance Corporal Phillips had been awarded the Military Medal for visiting the enemies’ lines and obtaining valuable information. He had been educated at Taunton College and Penarth School, and was prior to enlisting assistant surveyor at the Penrikyber Collieries, at which his father, Mr. T. E. Phillips, M.E,. is manager. He is a grandson of Ald. N. Phillips, J.P., New Tredegar, and Mr. T. Llewellyn, Hengoed. Lance Corpl. Phillips was in his 19th year.

UK, Soldiers Died in the Great War, 1914-1919

Name: Harold Llewelyn Phillips
Birth Place: Mountain Ash, Glam
Death Date: 18 Nov 1917
Death Place: France and Flanders
Enlistment Place: Mountain Ash
Rank: Private
Regiment: Lancashire Fusiliers
Battalion: 2 8th Battalion
Regimental Number: 39068
Type of Casualty: Killed in action
Theatre of War: Western European Theatre
Comments: Formerly 297516, R.A.S.C., M.M.

Pte. E. J. Pople

25 September 1915 – “Miskin Soldier on German Methods.”
Pte E J Pople

Pte E J Pople

Pte. E. J. Pople, No. 8244, No. 4 Platoon, No. 1 Camp, 6th Trenching Batt., British Expeditionary Force, France, has sent us the following letter:- “I am writing somewhere in France to thank the people of Gladstone Street, Miskin, for their kindness to my brother, of 14 Gladstone Street, Pte. B. J. Pople, of the Somerset L.1. I was pleased to hear that he had such a fine welcome back at the dear old place. I am sorry that I was not with him. I hope to have the pleasure of coming back soon and thank them personally. He has been wounded in the shoulder but has gone back to his depot in Devonport. Well we are all having a fine time of it so far out here. I shall never forget the 5th of May, when they put the gas on us. I lost one of my best friends on the first of May. He died cursing the Germans. He was a well known chap in the Mount, and came out a few days before me. It was with the Dorset Regiment that I was then. I got wounded on Hill 60 on the 14th of May. So we have had it a bit hot since we came out here. I am pleased that the Dorset Regiment has got such a good name. All think the world of the Welsh boys out here. We have had the finest compliments that anyone could wish to get. We have no V.C. yet, but hope to have one soon. Well, we are beginning to find it quite cold now. I hope we shall be back in Blighted, as they call it out here, before the winter. The enemy ought to be paid out for the dirty work they have done on the poor Belgians. You would not believe it unless you saw it. Since I have been wounded I have been transferred to the Trenching Batt. for a few days. Then I shall be at them again.
I am sending a French bullet to my sister, Beatrice Pople, 1 Irene Street. I hope I shall soon return to her and my parents and brother.

P.S.- I get your paper every week out here. It helps to cheer us all and when I finish with it I hand it on to my pals.”

23 November 1918 – THREE GALLANT SONS.

Much sympathy is felt with Mr. and Mrs. F. Pople, 1 Irene Street, Miskin, who have had two sons killed in the war – L-Cpl E. J. Pople, Dorsets, and Sergt. B. J. Pople. The former had served three years in France, when he was killed on April 10th, and the Sergeant was killed by a shell exploding on August 9th, 1917. Another son, Stoker F. R. Pople, has been in stiff engagements on board H.M.S. Attentine III. The parents have received from the Commanding Officer of Sergt. Pople, a testimonial of his trustworthiness and bravery, and that he was one of the most popular N.C.O.’s in the regiment.

UK, Soldiers Died in the Great War, 1914-1919

Name: Edwin James Pople
Birth Place: Street, Som.
Death Date: 10 Apr 1918
Death Place: France and Flanders
Enlistment Place: Mountain Ash, Glam.
Rank: L Corporal
Regiment: Dorsetshire Regiment
Battalion: 1st Battalion
Regimental Number: 3/8244
Type of Casualty: Killed in action
Theatre of War: Western European Theatre
Comments: Formerly 12747, Somerset Light Infantry.

Sergt. G. Pople

8 June 1918 – “Mountain Ash M.M.”
Sergt. G. Pople

Sergt. G. Pople

Gratifying official news has just come to hand that Sergt. G. Pople (14022) 7th Battalion K.S.L.I., of Newtown, Mountain Ash, has been awarded the Military Medal for splendid service rendered in France in March last. The official record states that during his Company’s retirement they were in danger of being cut off by the Germans. Sergt Pople volunteered to go over the top in order to keep in touch with the rest of his company. Seeing an officer lying down with his two legs wounded, he bandaged the officer’s legs and carried him into safety. He then returned and blew up a trench mortar to prevent it falling into enemy hands. He was the only N.C.O. left in his company. He succeeded in rallying the few surviving men until the reserves came up, only 20 all told, holding the position. He joined the Army in August, 1914. He served for a period in Salonika, and has been in France just over a year. Previously he was a miner at Messrs Nixon’s Colliery, Mountain Ash.

Private David Powell

26 October 1918 – “Chaplain’s Tribute to a Miskin Hero.”
Private David Powell

Private David Powell

This is the photo of Private David Powell, son of Mr. W. Powell, 5 Jones Street, Miskin, who fell in action on the 8th of this month. He had not been in the Army 6 months, and had served in France only a month. He was 21 years of age. He has a brother and a brother-in-law who have served the colours 4 years. The fallen soldier was well known in Mountain Ash, and was a faithful member of the Blighty Boys’ Club before he enlisted. He worked at Cwmcynon Colliery. Appended is a letter received from the chaplain to the 15th Welsh Regt.:- “I cannot express how sorry I am to be the means of conveying bad news to you. Nevertheless, duty calls upon me to do so. No doubt you have read how the Welsh Division broke through the German lines on the 8th of this month, but, in this great dash many of our brave lads fell, and, alas! your son is one of them. He was killed by a shell with four others. He must have died immediately without pain. He was buried two days later in a British Cemetery near Villers Outreaicx, and a cross will be placed on his grave. The Church of England burial service was read over his remains. He was a good boy. He played his part well and made the supreme sacrifice. May God give you and your family strength to endure this sad experience. Please accept the assurance of my deepest sympathy in your terrible sorrow.- D. Davies, Chaplain.”

UK, Soldiers Died in the Great War, 1914-1919

Name: David Powell
Birth Place: Mountain Ash, Glam.
Death Date: 8 Oct 1918
Death Place: France and Flanders
Enlistment Place: Mountain Ash
Rank: Private
Regiment: Welsh Regiment
Battalion: 15th Battalion
Regimental Number: 76653
Type of Casualty: Killed in action
Theatre of War: Western European Theatre

Pte. Hugh Pritchard

25 May 1918 – “Miskin Man Missing.”
Pte. Hugh Pritchard

Pte. Hugh Pritchard

News has been received by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. W. Pritchard, 97 Clarence Street, Miskin, Mountain Ash, that their son, Pte. Hugh Pritchard, is missing since March 21st. He belonged to the Royal Irish Fusiliers, and had been in France for a considerable time. He was in the Army Reserve prior to the outbreak of war, and was called up in August, 1914. He is 26 years of age, and before the war was a miner employed at Messrs. Nixon’s Collieries. His parents would be glad of any further news concerning him.

21 December 1918 – HOME FROM GERMANY.

Terrible Tales Told by Mountain Ash Men.

Each day brings home more of our tired men who have been in the toils of Germany. Our representative has interviewed ten of these gallants, in order to place in the hands of our readers authentic news of their treatment.

. . .
Pte. Hugh Pritchard, Irish Fusiliers, 4 Troedyrhiw Road, Mountain Ash. – Was a Reserve man and went out in Aug., 1914. He was captured in the great German assault on March 27th this year. The food was awful and the bread really sawdust, washed down with sauerkraut soup and mangold mixture. He was kicked and beaten, and was employed behind the German lines all the time of his captivity. Within 20 minutes of the signing of the armistice he was set free. He found himself 40 kilometres from Holland with scarcely any clothes on his back. He arrived home on Dec. 4. He has one wound stripe.
. . .

L/Cpl. Llew Prole

15 December 1917 – “Miskin Australian.”
LCpl. Llew Prole

LCpl. Llew Prole

L/Cpl. Llew Prole, 34th Batt., Australian Imperial Forces, joined up at the outbreak of war, and sent to France in November, 1916. In June, while taking a message to headquarters, he was wounded in the head and neck by shrapnel, and was sent to Hospital at Eastbourne. He returned to the Mount in August last on sick leave. He left for a Convalescent Home in Weymouth, but in September was suddenly seized with cerebral hemorrhage and paralysis, the result of his wounds, which unfortunately left him suffering from loss of memory and speech. He left Weymouth Hospital last month for Australia. Before he left originally for Australia he resided with his sister, Mrs. Phillips, 23 Windsor Road, Miskin, and worked at Nixon’s Navigation Colliery.

Pte. R Prosser

19 February 1916 – Mountain Ash.

ANOTHER HERO.- News has arrived of the death of Pte. Reuben Prosser, Royal Welsh Fusiliers, who was killed in the Mediterranean on Jan. 2nd last. He was a son of Mrs. A. Prosser, 12 Graig Street, Mountain Ash, and resided at 29 Philip Street when living in the Mount.

18 March 1916 – Pte. R Prosser.
Pte. R Prosser, Mountain Ash

Pte. R Prosser, Mountain Ash

Pte. R Prosser, Royal Welsh Fusiliers, Mounted Gun Section. Killed in action in the Dardenelles on Jan 2nd. He has a wife and two children at 16 Phillip Street, Mountain Ash. He enlisted in October 1914.

UK, Soldiers Died in the Great War, 1914-1919

Name: Reuben Prosser
Birth Place: Llanwonno, Glam.
Death Date: 2 Jan 1916
Death Place: Gallipoli
Enlistment Place: Penrhiwceiber, Glam.
Rank: Private
Regiment: The Royal Welsh (Welch) Fusiliers
Battalion: 8th Battalion
Regimental Number: 31278
Type of Casualty: Killed in action
Theatre of War: Balkan Theatre
Comments: Formerly 4676, Royal Garrison Artillery.

Driver W. Penny Roberts

24 November 1917 – “LATE DRIVER W. P. ROBERTS, PENRHIWCEIBER.”
Driver W P Roberts

Driver W P Roberts

Mrs. Roberts, 35 Dillwyn Street, Penrhiwceiber, has received intimation that her husband, Driver W. Penry Roberts, R.F.A., has been killed in France. The following letter has been received from his officer:- “Dear Mrs. Roberts,- On behalf of the Battery, I am writing to assure you of our deepest sympathy and sorrow in your great loss. Your husband was a splendid driver and very popular among his fellows. He was a good horseman, always cheery and bright. You will be glad to hear that he suffered no pain, being killed instantaneously by a shell. He was doing his duty like a soldier and a man at the time. Owing to a great shortage of signallers in our battery, he had volunteered his services, and it is sad that his pluck should have led him to such an untimely end.- I remain, yours sincerely, M. W. Laing, 2nd Lieut.” Driver Roberts was the eldest son of Mrs. David Edwards, 72 Penrhiwceiber Road, and was in his 32nd year.

UK, Soldiers Died in the Great War, 1914-1919

Name: William Penny Roberts
Birth Place: Llamuithin, Montgomery
Death Date: 27 Oct 1917
Death Place: France and Flanders
Enlistment Place: Preston, Lancs
Rank: DVR.
Regiment: Royal Horse Artillery and Royal Field Artillery
Regimental Number: 29873
Type of Casualty: Killed in action
Theatre of War: Western European Theatre

8 December 1917 – IN MEMORIAM.

ROBERTS.- In loving memory of Driver W. Penny Roberts, R.F.A., killed in action in France on October 27th, 1917.

I often sit and think of him
When I am all alone
Memory is the only friend
Grief can call its own
The ivy on the oak
May wither and decay,
My love for you will still keep green,
And never fade away.

-Fondly remembered by his loving wife and children, father-in-law and mother-in-law at 31 Dillwyn Street, Penrhiwceiber.

Second Lieut. Trevor Rogers

15 December 1917 – “Sec. Lieut. TREVOR ROGERS.”
Sec. Lieut. Trevor Rogers

Sec. Lieut. Trevor Rogers

The news that Second Lieut. Trevor Rogers, of the Welsh Regiment, was killed in action on Saturday, Nov. 24th, 1917, was received by his wife, Mrs. Edith Rogers, 12 Alexander Terrace, Mountain Ash. He was the fourth son of Councillor and Mrs. Dd. Rogers, Ynysybwl, and prior to enlistment was a certificated teacher at the Carnetown Schools, Abercynon. He answered the call to arms in August, 1914, being one of the first from Ynysybwl to join. He enlisted as a private in the R.A.M.C., and soon won promotion. In July, 1915, with the rank of Sergeant he went out to the Dardanelles, and while there had many narrow and thrilling escapes. On recovering from an attack of dysentry he served in Egypt, and came home for a commission in December, 1916. He was gazetted in April, 1917, to the Welsh Regiment, and was drafted out to France in the following July. A fellow officer writes of him: “He was with us quite awhile, and we soon learned to love his cheerful and unselfish disposition. Full of life and vigour, always ready and just adored by his men.” He married in December, 1916, Miss Edith Thomas, of Mountain Ash. Councillor Rogers has two other sons with the Colours, Corporal Wm. Rogers, R.M.R.E., in France since May, 1916, and Driver Tal Rogers, R.F.A., who enlisted in the States and is now in training in the South of England.

UK, Soldiers Died in the Great War, 1914-1919

Name: Trevor Rogers
Death Date: 4 Nov 1917
Rank: 2 Lieutenant (T)
Regiment: Welsh Regiment
Battalion: 18th Battalion
Type of Casualty: Killed in action

Pte. Wm. John Rogers

27 October 1917 – “KILLED IN ACTION.”

News has been received by Mr and Mrs Joseph Rogers, 3 Victoria Street, Miskin, that their son, Pte. William John Rogers, Welsh Guards, has been killed in action. The following letter has been received:- “Dear Mr.: Rogers, You will have heard from the War Office about your son, Pte. W. J. Rogers, 1st Welsh Guards. He came into this clearing station with a severe wound in the head, and he never regained consciousness, so that he suffered no pain. He gave his life for his country as a brave soldier, and I laid him to rest in a little cemetery of which you can obtain a photograph. With deepest sympathy, I am, G. M. Wheeler, sympathy, I am. G. M. Wheeler, Church of England Chaplain.”

3 November 1917 – “Miskin Man Killed in Action.”
Pte. Wm. John Rogers

Pte. Wm. John Rogers

The above is a photo of Pte. Wm. John Rogers, Welsh Guards, son of Mr and Mrs Joseph Rogers, 3 Victoria Street, Miskin, who, as reported in last week’s Leader, fell in action in France on the 13th inst. He was 21 years of age.

UK, Soldiers Died in the Great War, 1914-1919

Name: William John Rogers
Birth Place: Llanwonno, Glam.
Death Date: 13 Oct 1917
Death Place: France and Flanders
Enlistment Place: Mountain Ash, Glam.
Rank: Private
Regiment: Welsh Guards
Battalion: 1st Battalion
Regimental Number: 2454
Type of Casualty: Died of wounds
Theatre of War: Western European Theatre

Lance Corporal Benjamin Roper

11 March 1916 – PENRHIWCEIBER. HOME ON LEAVE.

Lance-Corporal Ben Roaper [sic], of Quarry Row, has come, home on furlough. He was seriously wounded at the Dardanelles. Roaper was attached to the 1st 5th Welsh. He had been laid up at Millroad Hospital, West Derby. He stays now with his widowed mother. We wish him a speedy recovery.

21 April 1917 – Killed in Action.

ROPER.- On March 26th, 1917, Lance Corporal B. Roper, Welsh Regt., son of Mrs. A. Roper, 3 Morris Avenue, Penrhiwceiber. Deeply mourned by mother and sister.

21 April 1917 – PENRHIWCEIBER ROLL OF HONOUR. Three Killed and Two Wounded.

We regret to announce the deaths in action in the East of Sergeant J. James Jones, Lance Corporal Benjamin Roper, and Private Herbert Pearman, all of Penrhiwceiber. . . .

Lance Corporal Benjamin Roper enlisted in September, 1914, in the 4th Welsh, afterwards transferred to the 5th Welsh. He underwent training in Pembrokeshire. He went through the Dardanelles Campaign, was wounded and brought to this country. He was for 7 months in hospital in Liverpool. He had fever after having been wounded, which left him with a weak heart. He came home on leave, and had a cordial reception by his many friends. Subsequently he was sent to Egypt. In 8 days after landing he was killed in action at Gaza. A message of condolence from the King and Queen has been received by his mother and sister. He was the only son of Mrs. A. Roper, of 3 Morris Avenue, and was only 21 years old. Prior to enlistment he was employed as a collier at Penrikyber Colliery.
. . .

28 April 1917 – Lance Corporal Benjamin Roper
Lance Corporal Benjamin Roper

Lance Corporal Benjamin Roper

Lance Corporal Benjamin Roper, Penrhiwceiber, killed in Gaza.

UK, Soldiers Died in the Great War, 1914-1919

Name: Benjamin Roper
Birth Place: Llanwonno, Glam.
Residence: Penrhiwceiber, Glam.
Death Date: 26 Mar 1917
Death Place: Egypt
Enlistment Place: Pontypridd
Rank: L Corporal
Regiment: Welsh Regiment
Battalion: 1st 4th Battalion
Regimental Number: 240800
Type of Casualty: Killed in action
Theatre of War: Egyptian Theatre

12 May 1917 – Acknowledgments.

ROPER.- Mrs. and Miss Roper, 33 Morris Avenue, Penrhiwceiber,. desire to sincerely thank all friends for kind expressions and letters of sympathy received in their recent sad bereavement.

23 March 1918 – Family Notices

IN MEMORIAM.

ROPER. – In affectionate remembrance of Lance-Corpl. Benjamin Roper, beloved and only son of Annie Roper, 3 Morris Avenue, Penrhiwceiber, who made the supreme sacrifice at Gaza March 26th. 1917.

“Greater love hath no man than this, that a man lay down his life for his friends.”

-Lovingly remembered by his Mother, Sister and Friends.

29 March 1919 – In Memoriam

ROPER. – In ever loving memory of Lance-Corporal Benjamin Roper, killed in action, March 26th, 1917, at Gaza. – Lovingly remembered by mother and sister.

We must not murmur nor complain,
Trusting in Heaven to meet again.

Pte. George Saunders

17 July 1915 – Our Roll of Heroes.

Our illustrated list of local recruits this week is as follows:-
. . .

Private George Saunders, 15 Victoria Street, Miskin, with the Wiltshire Regiment.

. . .

17 July 1915 – Pte. George Saunders, Miskin
Pte. George Saunders, Miskin

Pte. George Saunders, Miskin

Captain Stanley A. Smith

16 February 1918 – “MOUNTAIN ASH MAN’S COMMISSION.”
Captain Stanley A. Smith

Captain Stanley A. Smith

Captain Stanley A. Smith, who has been promoted captain and adjutant of the Seventh Battalion of the Tank Corps, now serving in France, is the elder son of Mr. and Mrs. T. H. Smith, Denwood, Troedyrhiw Road, Mountain Ash. He joined the Public Schools Battalion in December, 1914, and proceeded to France with his battalion in 1915. After serving there some months he was sent home to Balliol College, Oxford, whence he was gazetted to the Tanks Corps in April, 1916. His younger brother (Archie) joined the Civil Service Rifles in April, 1916, and has also seen service in France, being twice wounded in the Battle of the Somme, and has now been given a commission in the 4th (R.) Welsh Regiment, and is at present stationed at Pembroke Dock.

Private John Stagg

12 May 1917 – “Penrhiwceiber Soldier Dies.”
Pte John Stagg

Pte John Stagg

News has been received of the death in action in Mesopotamia of Private John Stagg, better known as John Gear. Private Stagg enlisted at the outbreak of war and underwent training at Liverpool, Dover and elsewhere. He joined the Garrison Artillery, but at his request was transferred to the Royal Welsh Fusiliers. Two years he went to Mesopotamia and saw much fighting there. About 7 months ago he was wounded, a bullet piercing his ear. He was sent to a hospital on the borders of India. Eventually he returned to the fray, and was killed on the 11th of April. He leaves a wife and one child, who reside at Caemain Street, Ynysboeth. He is also mourned by Mrs. Gear, of 38 Church Street, who brought him up from childhood. She has herself lost a soldier son. He died from illness. Private Stagg was 33 years of age. He had served many years in the Militia.

UK, Soldiers Died in the Great War, 1914-1919

Name: John Henry Stagg
Birth Place: Shepton Mallet, Somerset
Residence: Ynysboeth, Glam.
Death Date: 11 Apr 1917
Death Place: Mesopotamia
Enlistment Place: Mountain Ash, Glam.
Rank: Private
Regiment: The Royal Welsh (Welch) Fusiliers
Battalion: 8th Battalion
Regimental Number: 31171
Type of Casualty: Killed in action
Theatre of War: Asiatic Theatres
Comments: Formerly 44180, Royal Garrison Artillery.

Private William Stanford

9 September 1916 – “Miskin Soldier Wounded.”
Pte W Stanford, Miskin

Pte W Stanford, Miskin

Private William Stanford, of the 18th Welsh Regiment, son of Mr. and Mrs. Stanford, of 20 Victoria Street, Miskin, was wounded on the 14th of last month at Mametz Woods. He was only 171/2 years of age when he joined the Army in April of last year. He was drafted out on June 2nd of this year. He is now lying at the Northern Glen Hospital, Leeds, and is making rapid progress towards recovery.

Driver W. Stenton

14 December 1918 – “Miskin. Soldier’s Death.”

Mrs J. Stenton has received the sad news that her husband, Driver W. Stenton, of the A.S.C., died on the 22nd of November at 53 Clearing Station, France, of broncho pneumonia. He had previously been gassed. He had served nearly four years in France. He was the eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. Stenton, 36 Thomas Street.

11 January 1919 – Driver W. Stenton, A.S.C.
Driver W. Stenton, A.S.C.

Driver W. Stenton, A.S.C.

This is the photo of Driver W. Stenton, 12663, A.S.C., of 1 Albany Street, Miskin, Mountain Ash, whose death was reported in the in Leader on Dec. 14th. The following letter has been received by his wife:- “Dear Madam,- I very much regret to inform you that your husband died in the 53rd Casualty Clearing Station on Nov. 22, 1918, from broncho pneumonia. He was buried at the Military Cemetery in France on the 23rd. Your husband was a good soldier an an excellent man in every way, respected by every man in his company. He together with 14 others were knocked down with influenza just as we were on the march to Germany t the 4th Army. He was too ill to continue. so I had to send him to Hospital in an ambulance at Cussnelles just before we crossed the frontier in to Belgium. I cannot tell you how sorry I am to lose him. He has done excellent work all through, continually going up at nights to the trenches under shell and machine-gun fire, with no thought or fear, and always ready to go anywhere. It was indeed hard luck, after going through what he had, to be knocked out by pneunionia. The fact that he died serving his country should be a consolation to you in your great sorrow. The officers and men of this unit wish me to express to you their deepest sympathy.- Yours faithfully, Arthur Palmer (Capt.).”

22 November 1919 – Family Notices

STENTON.- In loving memory of my dear husband, Driver William Stenton, A.S.C., who died of pneumonia in France, on 22nd of November, 1918.

‘Tis lonesome here without you,
And sad the weary way,
Nor is the world to me the same
Since you were called away.
But peaceful be your rest, dear Will,
It’s sweet to breathe thy name,
In life I loved you very dear,
In death I do the same.

– Ever remembered by his loving wife Jen, and family.

Other pages: A-C, D-E, F-H, I-L, M-O, T-Y
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